Strategy 5: 

Nail The Wealthy Client Experience

 Resources

Strategy 5: Nail the Wealthy Client Experience sets the foundation for your simple and elegant wealth management business. Through your wealth management process, you will attract, serve, delight and retain affluent clients—all while setting yourself clearly apart from your competition.

To start, we will provide context by comparing wealth management to the other major business model in use today. We will then provide you with the wealth management formula—our quick sketch of wealth management that will make it easy for you to describe to clients, prospective clients and other professional advisors.

From there, we will take you, step by step, through each of the five client meetings of the wealth management process. We’ll follow that with proven approaches for effectively attracting both additional assets to manage and introductions to qualified prospective clients as part of your wealth management process.

By the end, you will have implemented a world-class client experience that will attract affluent clients and turn your current clients into raving fans.

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Nail The Wealthy Client Experience Audio

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Nail The Wealthy Client Experience Transcript

Tools

Tools for Strategy 5:

Nail the Wealthy Client Experience

Wealth Management Process and Formula — Graphic overviews of the wealth management process and formula. May be customized with your firm name and logo.

Total Client Profile Interview Guide (Word) — The interview guide for conducting the discovery interview (Word version).

Total Client Profile Interview Guide (PDF) — The interview guide for conducting the discovery interview (PDF version).

Total Client Profile Sample (Hand drawn) — A sample Total Client Profile mind map in original hand drawn form.

Total Client Profile Sample (SmartDraw) — A sample Total Client Profile mind map created using SmartDraw.

Wealth Management Tracker — A form that enables you and your team to closely track a client or prospective client’s progress through the wealth management process. May be completed as a fillable PDF or printed and completed by hand.

Wealth Management Meetings Agendas, Letters and Scripts — Templates for all agendas and letters/emails along with recommended scripting for each meeting.

Total Client Profile Mind Map Templates — Templates for creating Total Client Profile mind maps in both Word and MindManager formats.

Second-Opinion Service Tools — A template for a second-opinion service flyer, templates for making the second-opinion offer via email and a letter for contacting prospective clients on the Do Not Call list.

2020 Wealth Management Plan — Sample investment plan, IPS and advanced plan. Data is updated through December 31, 2019.

Online Wealth Management Meetings — Templates for emails and agendas for conducting meetings online.

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Wealth Management

Process & Formula Template

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Total Client Profile Interview Guide Word Download

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Total Client Profile Interview Guide PDF Download

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Total Client Profile Sample

(Hand Drawn)

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Total Client Profile Sample

(Smart Draw)

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Wealth Management Tracker

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Wealth Management Meetings, Agendas, & Letters 

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Total Client Profile Mind Map Templates 

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Second Opinion Service Tools

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Online Wealth Management Meetings

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2020 Wealth Management Plan 

The Total Client Profile

The foundation of wealth management is your ability to truly know and understand your clients. While you are probably sure that you know most of your clients fairly well, the reality is that if you are like the majority of financial advisors, you still do not have enough understanding of your clients (or prospective clients) to be able to consistently make the on-target wealth management recommendations they need. Instead of having the information you need, you may have the wrong information or not enough information at all—even though you think you know your clients quite well.

Creating the Total Client Profile

To determine your clients’ and prospective clients’ needs, you must comprehend their entire financial pictures. These go far beyond specific asset management or estate planning requirements and into the realm of their most important values, relationships and lifelong dreams. Uncovering these will be the critical skill that you bring to the table: To excel as a wealth manager, you must excel at profiling your clients and prospective clients. In fact, the Total Client Profile will become one of your most important tools for building deep client relationships.

Nearly all financial advisors use some type of fact-finding process when first meeting with clients or prospective clients. However, these questions usually focus on assets and net worth and do relatively little to uncover who the clients really are. In contrast, the Total Client Profile consists of seven categories—only one of which concerns assets—to help ensure that you delve into all key areas. See Exhibit 5.1 for an overview.

You will create a Total Client Profile for each qualified prospective client or client during the Discovery Meeting, the first meeting in the wealth management process. We will describe this entire meeting in detail in the following sections.

To build the profile, you will ask a series of questions in each of the seven categories. Our recommended Total Client Profile interview guide is below and is also available for download from the Tools section of this strategy. We encourage you to become extremely familiar with this interview guide and be comfortable asking every single question.

Resources

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Total Client Profile Audio

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Total Client Profile Transcript

Total Client Profile Interview Guide

Values

  • What’s important to you about money?

  • What in particular is important to you about that value?

  • Is there anything more important than that value?

Goals

  • What are your top accomplishments? What would you like them to be?

  • What are your personal goals?

  • What are your professional goals?

  • What do you do (or want to do) for your children?

  • What do you do (or want to do) for your parents?

  • What do you do (or want to do) for other family members or close friends?

  • What do you want to do for the world at large?

  • Ideally, where would you like to be when you are 45? 55? 65? 75?

  • What are your quality-of-life desires (houses, travel, boats, cars)?

  • What would you like to achieve with your money?*

  • In dollar figures, how much money do you need or want?

  • When you think about your money, what concerns, needs or feelings come to mind?*

  • If you didn’t have to work anymore, what would you do?

Relationships

  • Which family member relationships (spouse, children, siblings, parents, etc.) are the most important ones to you?

  • How important are your relationships with people you work with?

  • How important are your relationships with people in the community?

  • What is your religious orientation? How devout are you? How important are your relationships with people associated with your religion?

  • Would you describe yourself as an introvert or an extrovert?

  • What pets do you have? How important are they to you?

  • What schools did you go to? How important is your relationship with these schools?

Assets

  • What is your source of income (privately held business, employer, profession)?

  • How do you make money today? How is that likely to change in the next three years?

  • How do you save or set aside money to invest? How is that likely to change in the next three years?

  • What are your investment holdings? Explain your strategy for handling your investments in the way you do.

  • What benefits do you get from your workplace?

  • What life insurance do you have?

  • What property do you have (real property, artwork, jewelry)?

  • How are your assets structured now?

  • What new assets do you expect to receive (for example, from inheritances or stock options)?

  • What is your opinion of taxes? What kinds of taxes bother you the most?

  • When you think about your finances, what are your three biggest worries?

  • What were your best and worst financial moves? What happened?

Advisors

  • Do you have a lawyer? How do you feel about the relationship?

  • Do you have a life insurance agent? How do you feel about the relationship?

  • Do you have an accountant? How do you feel about the relationship?

  • Do you have an investment advisor? How do you feel about the relationship?

  • Do you have a financial planner? How do you feel about the relationship?

  • What were your best and your worst experiences with a professional advisor?

  • Of late, how frequently have you switched professional advisors?

Process

  • How involved do you like to be in managing your finances?*

  • How many face-to-face meetings would you want over the course of a year?

  • How often would you like phone updates on your situation?

  • Do you want a call about your personal situation when there is a sudden change in the market?

  • Do you prefer our written communications to you to be by letter or by email?

  • What security measures do you want to see used to protect your personal and financial information?

  • How often do you want an overall review of your financial situation and progress toward your goals?

  • Whom else do you want involved in the management of your finances (spouse, other advisors such as accountant or an attorney)?

  • How important to you is the confidentiality of your financial affairs?*

Interests

  • Do you follow sports? Which are your favorite teams?

  • What are your favorite types of TV programs and movies?

  • What do you read?

  • Do you have health concerns or interests? What is your health program?

  • Are working out and fitness important to you? What is your program?

  • What are your hobbies?

  • What would an ideal weekend be?

  • What would an ideal vacation be?

  • What charitable causes do you donate to? Volunteer for?

*Indicates questions that determine high-net-worth personality.

We recommend that you ask every single question exactly as it is written in the interview guide for your first 20 Discovery (or Rediscovery) Meetings. If you need to ask additional questions to gain additional clarity, that’s fine, but do not modify or drop any of the questions in the interview guide during these first meetings.

With 20 Discovery or Rediscovery Meetings under your belt, you will have enough experience to begin to test modifications to the Total Client Profile interview questions. If you make changes that yield a broader or deeper insight into your clients, please let your CEG Worldwide coach know. We will test the questions ourselves and build them into the interview guide if our testing shows positive results.

Understanding The Rationale of Each Question

Every question in the Total Client Profile interview guide is designed to reveal key information that will help you astutely manage the client’s investments, identify and address advanced planning issues, and build a trusted relationship with the client. The chart below provides the specific rationale for each question.

Documenting the Total Client Profile with Mind Mapping

As you proceed through the interview, we recommend that you use mind mapping to create a graphic representation of the Total Client Profile. Mind mapping was first developed in the 1960s by Tony Buzan, an expert on the brain and learning, to help students take notes by using only key words and images. For working with a client during the discovery process, mind mapping has important advantages over traditional note taking:

  • It helps you to drill down to the client’s key issues faster and more accurately.

  • It captures information quickly yet in a highly organized format.

  • It makes it easy to link and cross-reference very different yet connected pieces of the client’s financial picture.

  • It involves clients more deeply in the discovery process, motivating them to provide you with all the information you need to complete their client profiles.

  • It provides a basis for moving forward, with clear goals and next steps.

  • It provides you with a document that is fast and easy to review.

  • It is an excellent starting point for brainstorming solutions with members of your network of professional advisors.

There are four elements to every mind map:

  1. The subject. This is the center of attention and focus of the entire map. For wealth managers, the subject is the client or prospect.

  2. Major themes. These are major topics that radiate from the subject. For most clients or prospects, these themes should correspond with the seven categories of the Total Client Profile: values, goals, relationships, assets, advisors, process and interests.

  3. Branches. These connect the subject and major themes with each other and with associated details.

  4. Structure. The entire structure of the mind map is held together by the branches, forming an interconnected picture.

In addition to these major components, mind maps can include any other graphic elements that will help to fully capture both hard information and nuance. These might include symbols, call-outs, colors, boxes, circles and arrows—the only limit is your imagination.

To create a Total Client Profile using mind mapping, use an artist’s pad or notepad (preferably with unlined paper). Start by writing down the client’s name in the center of the paper and circling it. Then begin your discovery interview. Your first topic is the client’s values, so “values” near the client’s name, circle it and connect it back to the client’s name with a line. As you uncover the client’s most important values, note these and connect them with one another as appropriate. You may find that you need several levels of detail to accurately capture the client’s responses.

As you progress through the interview, do not let the mind map constrain your conversation. It is intended to do just the opposite: to trigger connecting questions, stimulate subsequent thoughts and capture random yet important details. You do not need to “finish” one branch before moving on to other topics. Instead, let the map flow along with your discussion. Look for fact patterns—sets of facts that are conditional on one another.

We have found that most clients enjoy the interview/client-profiling process and like seeing their financial situations presented in a graphical way. Many will actively help you to fill in any holes or gaps in key information. By the time you have completed your interview, you will have a profile that has captured the most important issues, is packed with relevant detail and suggests the next steps.

Click the image to see an enlarged image of a sample Total Client Profile in handwritten form. This illustrates a typical completed mind map—what you would expect upon completion of your discovery interview.

After the Discovery Meeting, have an assistant transfer your handwritten Total Client Profile to your computer system by using a mind mapping software program. See the Resources section for a listing of major mind mapping programs.

 

Click the image to see an enlarged image of a sample of a Total Client Profile created using a software program. This sample shows you what the hand drawn mind map looks like after it has been created with a software program. This was created using SmartDraw, a popular mind mapping program. You can download templates for creating your Total Clients in both Word and MindManager, another popular mind mapping program, from the Tools section.

Identifying Values Effectively

Of the seven categories that make up the Total Client Profile, the most important is the one representing the client’s values. In fact, one of the most important conversations you can ever have with clients or prospective clients is about their values.

Why are values so powerful? Because they are one of the core motivations for everything we do in our lives. They have a profound impact on every important decision we make, from what we choose to do for a living to whom we marry to how we spend our free time—in short, who we are as people.

For example, most people who are parents would tell you that they value their children above almost everything else in the world. As a result, they want to protect them, to educate them well and to set them on a smooth path in life. Financially speaking, one of the things many of these parents want to do is build an adequate college fund for their children. This is a common goal known to every financial advisor. But underlying that goal is the fundamental value of loving their children.

As important as values are, however, most people are not particularly good at articulating them. While they act definitively on their values, most have not necessarily thought deeply about exactly what those values are. So when you ask your clients to identify their core values, you not only uncover exactly where your own focus should be in assisting those clients, you also help them to clarify their direction and what they want to achieve in life.

The Total Client Profile interview guide will help you uncover your clients’ values systematically. It leverages work done by social psychologists and developmental psychologists during the late 1960s and early 1970s. As an industry, we’re indebted to Bill Bachrach and his “values-based selling” approach for making this work on values clarification accessible to financial advisors.

The values section of the interview begins with the question, “What’s important to you about money?” Assuming, for this example, that the client answers, “Security,” you would then ask, “What is important to you about security?” If the client responds, “Knowing that I can take care of my family,” you would then ask, “What is important to you about taking care of your family?”

You would continue uncovering the client’s values in this way until you think you have heard his or her final answer. Then you would ask the confirming question: “Is there anything more important to you than (the last value mentioned)?” If the client says “Yes,” then ask, “What is more important?” and continue with the questioning format. Once the client answers “No,” you will have likely uncovered the client’s single most important value.

While this is straightforward on the surface, it’s important to realize that it takes skill to drill down to the client’s most important value. In fact, most advisors tend to do only partial values conversations, ending them before the core values have been identified.

It’s useful to know that there are generally three levels to every values conversation:

  • Level one. This level is about the basic self, including issues such as security, financial freedom and not having to worry about paying the bills.

  • Level two. This level is about others, including family, friends and community.

  • Level three. This level is about the higher self, including issues of faith, destiny and reasons for being.

Many financial advisors end the values conversation at level two or even level one. However, you have to persevere through to level three. You can encourage the client to move to the next level by matter-of-factly observing, “We’re not done.” You will usually know that the client has reached level three and that the conversation is nearly over when he or she moves into abstract, or even esoteric, territory. You want to reach a point where you are talking about something that deeply inspires the client.

Determining High-Net-Worth Personality

As you proceed through the Total Client Profile interview, you have the opportunity not only to gather key information about each client or prospective client, but also to determine his or her high-net-worth personality.

As you will recall from Strategy 2: Implement Wealth Management, affluent clients tend to fall into one of nine different high-net-worth personality types. Each type brings unique needs and perspectives to the table. By understanding which personality each of your affluent clients has, you will be able to communicate and meet their needs much more effectively.

Built into the Total Client Profile are four questions that are designed to reveal the high-net-worth personality. Each question is open-ended, so you may need to ask only one to pinpoint the personality, or you may need to go through all four.

 

1. “What would you like to achieve with your money?”

This question will reveal two different personality types:

  • The Family Steward, whose primary motivation is to protect his or her family in every way possible, including financially. Family Stewards will answer this question with full explanations of everything they would like to do for their families, such as funding college for children or estate planning to ensure harmonious division of their assets among family members.

  • The Independent, whose primary goal is personal freedom. In response to this question, Independents will tell you about their achieving financial independence in order to pursue their dreams, such as early retirement or a vacation home.

 

2. “When you think about your money, what concerns, needs or feelings come to mind?”

This question will help you identify these three types:

  • The Accumulator, who has more financial knowledge than most other types and is focused solely on accumulating additional assets. What Accumulators will do with these assets is secondary; they are just driven to acquire them.

  • The Mogul, who values money for the power it gives. Because they like to control people and their surroundings, Moguls’ responses will be all about having more money in order to have more control.

  • The VIP, who is status-oriented, desiring to be recognized and acknowledged for his or her possessions and lifestyle. The VIP will answer this question in terms of how money is important for what it can buy and the status it can confer.

 

3. “How involved do you like to be in managing your finances?”

This question will reveal these personalities:

  • The Phobic, who dislikes and even fears investing. Because they are intimidated by investing, Phobics’ answers will be all about the worry and burden they feel around it. Many will simply try to change the subject completely.

  • The Gambler, who loves investing and is extremely knowledgeable about it. Because it is very often their hobby, Gamblers will answer this question by talking about the excitement of investing and the thrill of market volatility.

  • The Innovator, like the Gambler, knows and loves investing. But rather than being attracted to the emotion of investing, the Innovator is drawn to its intellectual challenge. The Innovator’s answer will reveal technical sophistication and a desire to be on the cutting edge of investing trends.

4. “How important to you is the confidentiality of your financial affairs?”

Your final question will pinpoint just one personality, the Anonymous. While confidentiality is important to all groups, the Anonymous are fanatical about it. They are extremely concerned about personal security and look for constant assurance that their advisors will protect the integrity of their information. Their answers to this question will clearly indicate this intense focus on confidentiality.

The answers you receive will give you a clear idea of the personality that you are working with, but you should follow up with an additional question or statement to confirm that your first impression is valid. These “trial balloon” questions should reiterate what you understand, albeit with a bit of hesitation so that you are not locked in.

Here is an example of a trial balloon that you might use with a client you believe is a Family Steward:

“Let me make sure I’ve got this right. It seems your family’s well-being is your primary concern. We’re going to create a portfolio that’s focused on your family, that’s going to really take care of them long term. Is that your goal?”

Watch and listen closely to the client’s reaction. The client will either respond positively, confirming that you are correct, or negatively. In the latter case, return to the four questions to get more information.

Here are some other trial-balloon questions to use with prospects who may be one of the remaining high-net-worth personality types:

Phobics

“I get the feeling you’re not that comfortable with investing. Is that true? That’s okay, because I am, and I am going to do my best to make sure that your goals are met so that you don’t have to worry.”

Independents

“It’s really important to you to have the investment resources in the bank to make sure you can do what you want. From talking to you, I sense that what you want is the freedom to do whatever you want. Maybe retire at 55 and pursue some hobby or interest. Is that right?”

The Anonymous

“You operate similarly to the way I work with my clients. My key concern is that confidential information stays confidential. When we work together, you can rest assured that confidentiality is one of my highest priorities.”

 

Moguls

“I feel that you want to be in ultimate control of everything we do together. My job is to make sure that you have the best advice and information in order to make the big decisions. Do I have that right?”

VIPs

 

“It’s important that you know we work with some of the biggest names in the investment management industry. People who are at the same level as you. People who know and understand the appropriate investments for someone in your position.”

Accumulators

“It seems to me that you are very astute about money. You know how to save it and how to make it grow. I enjoy working with clients like you, and I’m going to do my best to make sure we create an investment strategy to make the most money possible. Are we on the right track? Is that what you want from a financial advisor?”

Gamblers

“Investing is exciting for you, just like it is for me. I love everything about investing: whether it’s finding a great stock, watching CEOs on CNBC or doing research on financials. Together, we can make sure we keep up with all the events going on. I sense that your ideal advisor is one who is as excited about the process of investing as you are.”

 

Innovators

“You have a great deal of knowledge about investing, and it’s very important to you to use state-of-the-art investment approaches. That’s precisely what my firm and I, in particular, specialize in.”

(Source of the high-net-worth personality diagnostic system: Russ Alan Prince and Brett Van Bortel, The Millionaire’s Advisor™, 2003.)

Handling Difficult Questions

There are two questions in the Total Client Profile interview guide that some financial advisors feel uncomfortable asking. Rather than skipping these questions, we suggest that you understand the reasons for those questions and how asking them can help you to serve your clients better. Here are those questions and the rationale behind them:

  • What is your religious orientation? How devout are you? Many people are passionate about their religion, and it often has a material effect on their finances. Without asking about it, you might never uncover this. For instance, when one financial advisor we work with inquired about a prospective client’s religious orientation, he found out that her biggest goal in life was to start a charitable organization in Israel. A successful businesswoman, she also wanted to hand over her business to her son so that she could head up the charity. These are critical insights, but they did not come out in the discovery interview at all until the financial advisor asked about her religion.

  • Would you describe yourself as an introvert or an extrovert? The answer to this question should give you a better understanding of how you can best support and communicate with the client. For example, a client who is an introvert may not prefer to attend large client events, but may appreciate smaller, more personal gatherings.

Digging Deeper to Uncover Opportunities

In most cases, you will find that the Total Client Profile interview guide is a starting point only. As each conversation progresses, your questions should build on the information you are gathering, to pinpoint issues of particular importance to the client or prospect. You may find it useful to organize your thinking by breaking out your questions by type:

  • Questions that obtain information. These questions are designed to jog clients’ memories and motivate them to share their information. (Examples: What life insurance do you have? Do you have an accountant? What benefits do you receive from your workplace?)

  • Questions that test comprehension. You need to ensure that clients are making informed decisions, based on a clear understanding of their issues. Any question that requires the client to rephrase, interpret, compare or add additional detail will accomplish this objective. (Example: Given the current structure of your family business, how do you think your ESOP is working for you?)

  • Questions that require analysis and evaluation. These questions will help you understand the personal, subtle and often sensitive issues clients have around their finances. (Examples: What family relationships are most important to you? Since you’re uncomfortable with your children inheriting your money all at once, how do you want that money administered and over what time frame?)

  • Questions that move the process forward. It is more effective to skillfully use questions to move the client or prospect to the next stage of working with you than it is to simply make assertions. (Examples: Whom else do you want involved in your decision making and in managing your finances? When would be a good time for us to review your alternatives?)

Using the techniques presented here, you will be able to create accurate, detailed pictures of your clients and prospective clients using the Total Client Profile. As you will see throughout this strategy, the Total Client Profile will help support your entire wealth management process.

Introduction to the Client Meetings

When you provide a world-class experience for your clients, and do so consistently, year in and year out, you will deliver on a value promise that competitors will find extremely difficult to touch.

However, there’s a substantial challenge in basing your value promise on your client experience: You must have systems in place to deliver the experience consistently and cost-effectively. Without these systems, you create a nightmare of endless rounds of one-offs.

To meet this challenge, you will implement a systematic process and then replicate it again and again. This process will enable you to provide true mass customization: While your systems will function like an assembly line in the background, each client and prospective client will experience it as a true custom experience that addresses their unique needs.

We believe you will find the wealth management process to have one of the most significant impacts on your business that you have ever experienced. This is what you can expect:

  • You will be perfectly positioned to leverage your core competency in client relationship management.

  • You will systematically build trusted, high-quality relationships with clients.

  • You will uncover your clients’ true financial issues with a high degree of accuracy, which in turn will enable you to determine the appropriate actions for addressing those issues.

  • You will delight your clients, who will be more likely to provide both additional assets to manage and introductions to qualified prospects. This in turn will lead to greater revenue and, ultimately, a substantially higher net income.

  • Because the process is systematic and replicable process, you can offer it in a relatively cost-effective manner, increasing your profit margin.

The wealth management process is built around a series of five meetings with each client. (See Exhibit 5.2 for an overview.) To assist you and your team in executing on the process, we have created a wealth management tracker that is available for download from the Tools section of this strategy.

Discovery Meeting, Pt. 1

Resources

The first client meeting in the wealth management process, the Discovery Meeting, is focused on gaining complete, in-depth understanding of the prospective client so that you can make appropriate investment recommendations and later guide your professional network in providing advanced planning recommendations. As you gain this understanding, you will also begin to build the foundation for a trusting, long-term relationship with the individual or couple.

Goals of the Discovery Meeting

  • To immediately establish trust by positioning yourself as an authority in addressing the financial concerns of members of your niche community

  • To differentiate yourself from your competition through your superior client experience

  • To uncover the client or prospective client’s most important financial issues and to determine his or her high-net-worth personality

  • To collect all information necessary to assess suitability for your services

  • If appropriate, to collect all information necessary to complete an investment plan and advanced plan

  • To begin to position yourself as a personal chief financial officer

  • To begin to build a deeper personal connection by sharing your personal story.

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Discovery Meeting Transcript

Preparation for the Discovery Meeting

You have acquired a prospective client through your own acquaintance, an introduction from an existing client, a strategic alliance, a presentation or conversion of an existing client and have scheduled the Discovery Meeting.

To ensure that the meeting is as productive as possible, send a letter to the prospective client that confirms the meeting and lists the information you need him or her to bring to the meeting. You should send this letter immediately after scheduling the meeting.

The following is a sample Discovery Meeting confirmation letter. (We will address all our sample correspondence and scripts for our meetings to our new affluent client, “Joe H.N.W. Client.”) You will find a customizable template for this letter and all communications we recommend for the wealth management process in the Tools section of this strategy.

"Dear Joe,

This letter is to confirm our appointment for Wednesday, April 23 at 9:00 a.m. in our offices. I have enclosed a map and driving instructions for your convenience. Please plan on the meeting lasting about 90 minutes.

At our meeting, we will ask you a series of questions to really understand what is most important to you, what you would like to accomplish and what keeps you awake at night. We will determine where you are now, where you want to be and any gaps or obstacles that stand in the way. It’s our chance to get a very clear picture of you so that we can guide you in how best to achieve your most important goals.

To help us obtain a comprehensive view of your financial situation, please bring the following:

  1. Your last two years’ income tax returns

  2. Any recent financial statements prepared for refinancing, etc.

  3. Current bank statements, if any

  4. Current mutual fund statements, if any

  5. Current brokerage statements, if any

  6. Current mortgage statements, if any

  7. Current life insurance policies, if any

  8. Current employee benefit statements, including those for 401(k) or other retirement plans, if any

  9. Any wills or trust documents

  10. Anything else you believe would be useful for me to gain a better understanding of your financial situation

Please bring in the originals of each of the documents. My staff will make copies while we are meeting.

If you have problems locating any of the information, please give me a call so we can help direct you to the proper source to obtain the necessary information.

We look forward to exploring how we might be able to assist you in achieving your financial goals.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

In addition, prepare an agenda for the meeting. All pilots, no matter how proficient, use a pre-flight checklist to ensure that they have checked every system and performed every key task, As a top financial advisor, you should have your own checklist—an agenda—in front of you for every meeting.

While some financial advisors mail the agenda to the prospective client in advance of the meeting, we recommend that you simply review it with him or her at the beginning of each meeting. The following is a sample of the agenda you would use for the Discovery Meeting.

Discovery Meeting Agenda

Mr. Joseph H.N.W. Client

Wednesday, April 23
9:00 a.m.

  1. Ideal outcome for our meeting

  2. Overview of agenda

  3. Total Client Profile interview

  4. Review of financial paperwork

  5. Assessment of ability to add value

  6. Overview of next steps in our wealth management process

  7. Definition of wealth management

  8. Schedule the Investment Plan Meeting, if appropriate

In final preparation for the Discovery Meeting, place five things on the desk or table where you will meet with the prospective client:

 

  1. The agenda for the meeting. A customizable template for this agenda and all other wealth management meeting agendas are available for download from the Tools section of this strategy.

  2. A copy of the Total Client Interview guide. Both Word and PDF versions of interview guide may be downloaded from the Tools section.

  3. A flip chart or artist’s pad of unlined paper for creating the mind map.

  4. A two-page graphic overview of your wealth management process and wealth management formula. An overview that you may customize with your firm name and logo is available for download from the Tools section.

  5. A digital voice recorder (or phone with voice recorder). This allows you to easily upload the sound file to be inexpensively transcribed by an online transcription service. Record only the Total Client Profile interview portion of the Discovery Meeting, not any other parts of any other meetings in the wealth management process. Important: Some firms do not allow client meetings to be recorded, so before making any recordings, be certain to get authorization from your compliance group and to find out the retention requirements for the recordings.

 

Overview of Discovery Meeting steps

  1. Greet the prospective client by name, using a formal greeting.

  2. Acknowledge the prospective client’s desire to explore working together.

  3. Explain the ideal outcome of the meeting and how you will conduct the meeting.

  4. Conduct the values and goals sections of the Total Client Profile interview as you begin to create a mind map.

  5. Pause to assess whether you could add substantial value to the prospective client’s situation.

  6. Conduct the remainder of the Total Client Profile while you complete the mind map.

  7. Describe the next steps in your process.

  8. Define wealth management.

  9. Tell your personal story.

  10. Schedule the next meeting.

  11. Send confirmation for the next meeting.

Discovery Meeting, Pt. 2

Detailed steps and scripts for the Discovery Meeting

Step 1. Greet the prospective client by name.

Have every employee who might come into contact with the prospective client, such as your receptionist and/or another team member assisting you in the Discovery Meeting, greet the person by name, using a formal greeting. This shows that you have prepared for the meeting and are focused on the client every step of the way.

Good morning, Mr. Prospective Client. We’ve been looking forward to seeing you today. Mr. Financial Advisor will be right with you.

Depending on what is more generally accepted in your part of the country or the world, you may want to use either an informal or a more formal greeting style.

Offer appropriate beverages and reading material in your lobby. Ideally, the reading material will be copies of articles you have written, along with lifestyle magazines focused on topics of interest to your target market, such as sailing, fine architecture or luxury travel. Avoid personal finance magazines. Likewise, if you have a TV in your waiting area, play lifestyle DVDs or tune it to the Travel Channel—not CNBC. This sets the stage for what you are all about as a financial advisor: helping your clients to achieve their financial dreams.

Step 2. Acknowledge the prospective client’s desire to explore working together.

Because it is very important to position yourself as an authority, do not thank the prospective client for attending the meeting. Instead, simply recognize his or her willingness to consider working with you:

“Joe, I am very much looking forward to exploring your financial goals with you to determine whether we are the right firm to help you in achieving those goals. We limit our practice to successful families in (insert your niche here) for whom we can make a significant impact. If we’re not the right firm for doing this, we promise to point you in the right direction.”

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Discovery Meeting Pt.2 Transcript

Step 3. Explain the ideal outcome of the meeting and how you will conduct the meeting.

Set the stage for what you want to accomplish by stating the ideal outcome for the meeting. As you do, ask for buy-in from the prospective client. Describe it like this:

“I’d like to start by setting out what the ideal outcome for our meeting would be. We want to gain a deep understanding of what matters most to you as well as the challenges you face in accomplishing your most important goals. This will help us know whether we’re the right firm to assist you in making even smarter decisions about your money. If we are, it will also help us to create a wealth management plan for you. How does that sound to you?”

Now refer to your agenda to walk through each step of the meeting, briefly describing what will happen at each step. If your firm allows you to record the meeting, explain why you want to make the recording:

“Joe, I’m going to ask you a series of questions around seven major themes so that I understand where you are now, where you want to go and what the gaps are.

“To ensure that I capture everything and so that I can focus on your responses, I’m going to record our conversation. This recording is confidential and will be for internal use only.”

If the prospective client asks for a copy of the recording, be sure to supply one.

Step 4. Conduct the values and goals section of the Total Client Profile interview as you begin to create a mind map.

Once the client is ready, turn on your recorder and kick off the interview like this:

“I’m here with Joe H.N.W. Client on Wednesday, April 23. The following is a recording of our discovery interview.”

Refer to your Total Client Profile interview guide as needed to ensure that you ask each question in the first two categories. Be ready to ask probing follow-up questions as appropriate. As your prospective client speaks, begin to draw the mind map.

If you are recording the interview, you may be tempted to skip creating the mind map at the same time, believing that this will enable you to better focus on the prospect and his or her answers. We strongly encourage you to always create the mind map as you conduct the interview. Not only is it much more time efficient than creating it later, it will help you make connections and see gaps in the prospective client’s financial picture that you might otherwise miss. In addition, it will help the prospective client become more invested in the process—many will volunteer information to help you complete the map that you would not have otherwise heard. In short, rather than distracting from the interview, mind mapping will greatly enhance its effectiveness.

Step 5. Assess whether you could add substantial value to the prospective client’s situation.

Once the values and goals sections are complete, take a moment to calculate what you will be able to contribute to the prospective client’s financial life. Ask for the financial documentation and briefly review in a nonjudgmental manner. You want to determine if he or she is suitable for your services as well as to see if there is anything in the documentation that will prompt additional questions. If you believe at this point that you could add substantial value, ask your assistant to photocopy the financial documents. Then go on to the next step.

If you believe that you could not add substantial value, inform the prospective client that yours may not be the best firm to assist him or her; then recommend a more appropriate firm. Explain it like this:

“Right now I’m not sure that we’re the right firm for you. Given what you’ve shared with me, I’d recommend Firm XYZ. I’d be happy to give them a call and set up a meeting for you there.”

The prospective client will likely want to know why you believe that you are not the right firm for him or her. Very often it will be because the individual does not meet your minimum assets requirement. When this is the case, say this:

"When we turn away potential clients, it is typically because they don’t have sufficient assets to meet our minimum fee. With our minimum fee of (insert your minimum fee here), I don’t think we’d make a big enough impact now to justify that fee. We always want to make an impact well above what we charge, but we would not be able to do that here.”

Prospective clients will often ask coming back to meet with you when they do have enough assets. Of course tell them that you will be happy to meet with them again when it’s appropriate. Interestingly, these people often turn out to be excellent sources of client introductions because they have witnessed how exclusive you are. They have never before been turned away by a financial professional.

Also at this point, if you have any reason to believe that you may not be “connecting” with the prospective client but you believe that he or she is qualified for your services, take a moment to gain a pre-commitment for moving forward. Simply say this:

“I just want to check in with you at this point. If we could design a wealth management plan that helps you to achieve all that is important to you, including (name his or her most important values and goals), would that be a basis for us working together?”

Assuming that the prospective clients agrees that you would have a basis for working together, move on to the next step.

When a prospective client fails to bring financial paperwork

On rare occasions, a prospective client may forget—or be unwilling—to bring to the Discovery Meeting the financial paperwork you requested. You can handle this in one of three ways:

We encourage you to experiment with all three until you find the one that you are most comfortable with. Prospective clients showing up unprepared is rare, but you will need to find a way to handle this challenge in a manner that resonates best with you.

Step 6. Conduct the remainder of the Total Client Profile and complete the mind map.

Now ask the questions from the remaining five categories of the Total Client Profile interview guide. As you do, complete the remainder of the mind map.

Step 7. Describe the next steps in your process.

Describe where you are within the wealth management process and what the next steps will be. Show the first page of the two-page graphic overview of the process as you explain it:

“We’ve gone over all the information that we need to move ahead. Our job now is to use the information we’ve gathered to formulate your investment recommendations. I would like to schedule a meeting to go over the investment plan that we will develop."

“At that meeting, I’ll walk you through your plan step-by-step and share with you the investment strategies that we would recommend for you to maximize the probability of achieving your goals."

“Our job is to help you make informed decisions with your money. We often find that we can add the most value by preventing clients from making costly mistakes. One of the best ways to avoid costly mistakes is having a plan that will work over the long term.”

You have now set the stage for the next meeting, the Investment Plan Meeting. In order to differentiate yourself from the classic salesperson masquerading as an investment consultant, you can then add this:

“At our next meeting, after the investment plan presentation, we find that many people want to immediately move ahead. In fact, you may decide that you want to invest your money with me at that point in time. If so, I’m going to hold you off on that. Instead, I want you to take the plan home so that you have plenty of time to review it. We do this because we’re looking for a lifelong relationship here, not short-term investment transactions.”

Now set the stage for the subsequent Mutual Commitment Meeting:

“At the end of that next meeting, we’ll schedule a third meeting. This meeting will be about making a mutual commitment to work together. We’ll decide whether we’ve identified specifically where you want to go and the plan for maximizing the probability of achieving success. We’ll commit to each other to work together toward reaching all that’s important to you. We’ll answer any questions that you have about the plan and make any fine-tuning adjustments, if necessary. From there, you’ll execute all the documents needed to get the plan started."

“After that Mutual Commitment Meeting, we’ll schedule yet another meeting about 45 days out. Cleverly, we call it our 45-Day Follow-up Meeting. As you probably know, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by all the paperwork you receive whenever you transfer accounts or open new ones. We’ll help you organize all that paperwork as well as answer any questions you may have about it.”

Finally, set the stage for a long-term relationship and introduce yourself as a personal chief financial officer.

“Following our 45-Day Follow-up Meeting, we’ll set up Regular Progress Meetings. We’ll get together on a regular basis, such as quarterly or just once or twice a year, depending on what you want."

“At our first Regular Progress Meeting, I’ll present to you the advanced plan that my team and I will have created. While the investment plan sets the foundation of your financial house, the advanced plan looks beyond investments to address other financial issues that may be critical to you for reaching all your financial goals. These will include wealth enhancement, wealth transfer, wealth protection and charitable giving. As your personal chief financial officer, my team and I will help you take care of these issues."

“We’ll discuss which areas of your advanced plan you would like to implement first. At subsequent Regular Progress Meetings, my job will be to report to you the progress we are making toward achieving your goals.”

Step 8. Define wealth management.

Once you have finished describing your wealth management process, take a moment to give the prospective client a big-picture look at how you work:

“Now that you know how we work, I’d like to briefly describe why we work this way. You see, we’ve found that most affluent clients want their financial advisors to help them with more than just investments. They want real wealth management—a complete approach to addressing their entire financial lives. That’s what we offer at our firm. Let me show you what I mean by that.”

Now go to the second page of your two-page graphic overview. Point to the wealth management formula in the upper left corner of the page. Then walk through the formula like this:

“We define wealth management as a formula: WM = IC + AP + RM. IC stands for investment consulting, astutely managing investments over time to help you achieve your financial goals."

“Next is advanced planning, or AP. Advanced planning goes beyond investments to look at all the other aspects that are important to your financial life. We break it down into four parts I mentioned a few moments ago: wealth enhancement, wealth transfer, wealth protection and charitable giving. In our experience, very few financial advisors offer these services."

“The final element is relationship management. As a wealth manager, I’m focused on building relationships with three groups. The first and most obvious group is my clients. To meet their needs effectively, I have to have solid, trusting relationships with them. Next, I manage a network of financial professionals. These are specialists I can call in to make recommendations on specific advanced planning needs. And last, I work with my clients’ other professional advisors, such as their attorneys and accountants.”

Step 9. Tell your personal story.

Now take a moment to share your personal story of why you care so much about serving your clients extremely well. Transition into your story like this:

As you can see, we pay a lot of attention to detail with our process. The reason I care so much about doing it so well is because …”

Now briefly relay the story of what inspired you to become a financial advisor and to assist people in solving their financial challenges. You developed this this story in Strategy 4: Articulate Your Value Promise. Aim to tell the story in no more than 90 seconds.

Step 10. Schedule the next meeting.

Once you have finished your story, set a specific date and time for the Investment Plan Meeting:

“As you know, our next meeting is the Investment Plan Meeting. Would Monday, May 5 at 3:00 p.m. work for you? We’ll need about one hour.”

Now wrap up the meeting. Again, do not thank the prospective client for seeing you. Instead, close with this:

“Joe, I enjoyed meeting with you. I’m really excited to work with you and about obtaining very positive results for you over time. I believe that I can add substantial value to your financial life. And I believe that you will enjoy the process as we start together on the journey of achieving all your financial goals.”

We recommend that you allow ten days to two weeks between the Discovery Meeting and the Investment Plan Meeting. You may have systems in place that allow you to turn the entire process around in a single day, but doing so will greatly diminish your perceived value in the eyes of your clients and prospective clients.

Step 11. Send confirmation for the next meeting.

Always close the loop. To do so after the Discovery Meeting in this situation, immediately send a letter (or email) that expresses your pleasure at having met the prospective client, that outlines what will be accomplished at the Investment Plan Meeting, and that reconfirms the date and time for that meeting.

The letter/email below is an example. (From this point forward, send these communications by letter or email according to the preference expressed by the client during the Total Client Profile interview.)

"Dear Joe,

I wanted to let you know that I really enjoyed meeting with you today. As I mentioned at our meeting, I believe that I’ll be able to be of tremendous assistance in helping you to achieve all that is most important to you, in particular _________ and ____________.

As we discussed, our next step is our Investment Plan Meeting, at which I’ll present my recommendations for moving ahead toward reaching your goals. I believe that you’ll enjoy this meeting and the rest of our process as it unfolds.

I’m looking forward to meeting with you again on Monday, May 5 at 3:00 p.m. Plan on that meeting taking about an hour.

If you have any questions that I may answer before that time, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

    1. Reschedule the Discovery Meeting to a later date.

    2. Begin the meeting and make a determination of whether or not to proceed with the prospective client after you have asked the values and goals questions.

    3. Proceed with the meeting. At the end of the meeting, ask how he or she would like to handle sending the information to you so that you can proceed with the Investment Plan Meeting.

Discovery Meeting, Pt. 3

Common Objections

Because the wealth management process is designed to capture and address every prospective client’s most important goals, values and challenges, it is unusual to hear objections.

However, the prospective client may at this point ask about your fees. This is how you can address this concern:

“Because we have not yet developed our specific recommendations for your plan, it’s impossible to know the exact costs at this time. However, at our next meeting—the Investment Plan Meeting—I will be able to provide you with details on the fees and will be happy to review those with you. I can say that our clients have often commented on how reasonable they’ve found our fees to be.”

Some prospective clients will request references. In response, say this:

“We very much value our clients’ time, confidentiality and privacy. For that reason, we do not give out references until you have reviewed the plan and we are mutually committed to moving ahead. The last step of this process might be to check references. At that time, if you are still interested, we will provide references of people in situations similar to yours.”

In reality, we have found that by this time very few clients ask for references. And even those prospective clients who do ask for references seldom contact them.

However, before you ever provide references, contact the clients that you are using as references to secure their approval. Many top financial advisors have a list of their best clients who have agreed to be available for references as needed. You should develop this list for your practice as well.

Even if a client has previously agreed to be a reference, always give your client a heads-up to potentially expect a call from your prospective client.

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Discovery Meeting Pt.3 Audio

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Discovery Meeting Pt.3 Transcript

Critical success factors for the Discovery Meeting

  • Be confident. Approach the Discovery Meeting with confidence that you are providing a world-class client experience. And be confident that your ideal client profile will guide you well in determining suitability of the prospective client.

  • Be focused. The meeting should be extremely tight and last no more than 90 minutes. Too many advisors make this an endurance test.

  • Be efficient. Recognize that the affluent already have more than enough friends. What they often really have a shortage of is time. They want professionals who are extremely efficient.

Conducting the Discovery Meeting via video call

The ever-growing use of free or inexpensive video calling services has made it possible to easily meet with your clients wherever they may be. While we recommend face-to-face meetings whenever possible to most effectively build personal rapport, video calling can be a good alternative when in-person meetings are not an option.

For the most part, you would conduct client meetings via video call as you would in a face-to-face setting. One exception would be in how you handle your review of the prospective client’s financial paperwork during the Discovery Meeting. We recommend several slight modifications.

First, adjust your confirmation letter to prepare the prospective client for the video call, as in the sample below.

"Dear Joe,

This letter is to confirm our appointment for Wednesday, April 23 at 9:00 a.m. for our Discovery Meeting via Zoom. Please join me using this link and plan on the meeting lasting about 90 minutes.

At our meeting, we will ask you a series of questions to really understand what is most important to you, what you would like to accomplish and what keeps you awake at night. We will determine where you are now, where you want to be and any gaps or obstacles that stand in the way. It’s our chance to get a very clear picture of you so that we can guide you in how best to achieve your most important goals.

To help us obtain a comprehensive view of your financial situation, please have the following on hand during our call:

  1. Your last two years’ income tax returns

  2. Any recent financial statements prepared for refinancing, etc.

  3. Current bank statements, if any

  4. Current mutual fund statements, if any

  5. Current brokerage statements, if any

  6. Current mortgage statements, if any

  7. Current life insurance policies, if any

  8. Current employee benefit statements, including those for 401(k) or other retirement plans, if any

  9. Any wills or trust documents

  10. Anything else you believe would be useful for me to gain a better understanding of your financial situation

If you have problems locating any of the information, please give me a call so we can help direct you to the proper source to obtain the necessary information.

We look forward to exploring how we might be able to assist you in achieving your financial goals.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

You will conduct the initial part of the meeting as usual. Once you complete the values and goals questions of the Total Client Profile interview guide, ask the prospective client to bring out his or her paperwork. Now move through each item in the order it was listed on your confirmation letter, asking one or two brief questions about each. For example, on the tax returns, ask for the adjusted gross income. For investment statements, ask what is in the account and the total value of the account.

Keep these questions at a very high level and move through the list quickly. Do not get bogged down in detail here; your goal is simply to assess whether the prospective client has assets that are sufficient for you to add substantial value.

When finished, resume the meeting as if you were in person, picking up with the remainder of the Total Client Profile interview guide. At the end of the meeting, should the prospective client make the recommitment to move forward with you in the process, ask him or her to send you copies of the paperwork.

The Investment Plan Meeting

In this meeting, you will present the prospective client with the first two parts of the wealth management plan:

  • The investment plan. This is a summary of your proposed investment consulting work. It should include the Total Client Profile mind map, a summary of the prospective client’s current portfolio and your investment recommendations. Explain the reasons for your recommendations in a straightforward fashion, focusing on the four key drivers of investment success: return, risk, costs and taxes. The investment plan should also include an overview of your wealth management process and a brief description of your fees, your firm’s background and investment philosophy.

  • An investment policy statement (IPS). This should delve into substantially more detail about your investing approach and strategic portfolio management process. It also provides summaries of the returns of key indexes and of a range of hypothetical portfolios.

The investment plan and IPS, together with your advanced plan (which we will discuss shortly), will constitute the overall wealth management plan. A well-designed wealth management plan serves a number of important purposes:

  • It provides you with an opportunity to clarify and solidify the client’s goals. Drawing from the information you gathered during the Discovery Meeting, the investment plan portion of the wealth management plan documents all seven areas of the client’s Total Client Profile. The most critical area of investment decision-making concerns the client’s financial goals. By putting these goals in writing, the investment plan ensures that both you and the client are completely clear about this crucial area.

  • It provides long-term discipline for the client’s financial decision-making. A well-crafted wealth management plan helps ensure that rational analysis is the basis for the client’s financial decisions, making the client less likely to act on emotional responses to short-term or one-time events.

  • It promotes clear communication. Because it clarifies the issues that are most important to the client and the process you will use to address them, it can prevent misunderstandings that might otherwise arise.

  • It provides you with an opportunity to “wow” the client. The wealth management plan demonstrates that you are extremely thoughtful in your approach to addressing the client’s financial challenges. The document reflects your thorough preparation, systematic strategy and close attention to detail. By doing so, it will fully establish you as an authority in the eyes of the client.

  • It sets out a long-term road map. By taking a deliberate, methodical approach to entire range of financial concerns, it will help maximize the probability of achieving everything that is important in the client’s financial life.

 

Resources

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Investment Meeting Audio

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Investment Meeting Transcript

Goals of the Investment Plan Meeting

  • To provide the prospective client with an actionable investment plan that will maximize the probability of achieving the investment goals and a clear IPS that spells out your investment approach

  • To clearly demonstrate the value you can add to the prospective client’s financial life

  • To continue building the personal relationship—a process you began during the Discovery Meeting

Preparation for the Investment Plan Meeting

Your primary task in advance of this meeting is to create the prospective client’s investment plan. It’s important to note that we recommend creating an investment plan, not a financial plan. While many financial advisors recognize the power of astute financial planning, most have found it extremely difficult to execute either well or profitably. By positioning themselves as financial planners, they effectively are communicating to prospects that they are experts in all aspects of financial services—something that is simply impossible to be.

In contrast, when you create an investment plan, you communicate a much different message: that you are most focused on the one aspect of their finances that most affluent clients are most concerned about—preserving their wealth. As an investment consultant, you will address this critical task first. Only once the investment plan is in place will you turn to other aspects of the client’s financial situation, and you will do this by turning to your network of professionals in those areas.

In addition to the investment plan, you will need an investment policy statement. Because it outlines the investment approach and strategies you use with all clients, the IPS does not need to be customized for each prospective client.

When creating both an investment plan for a specific prospect and the IPS for all of your clients, keep in mind that simpler is better. Remember that prospective clients come to you because they perceive you to be an authority on investing. As such, they really just want the answers from you, not technical details. Think about this: If you went to see a cardiologist with a concern about your heart, you would expect the doctor to diagnose the problem and recommend a solution, not give you a cardiology textbook. Your role for your prospective clients is the same. If you want to produce an in-depth financial analysis or run detailed Monte Carlo simulations, that’s fine, but do it for your use—not because you think you need to impress your prospective client with technical information.

In the Tools section of this strategy, you will find samples of an investment plan, IPS and advanced plan that one of CEG Worldwide’s corporate clients has allowed us to use. These are samples only; you are welcome to use them, but you must customize them as appropriate for your own firm and your own investment approach. In particular, involve your compliance professionals, as different firms have different compliance requirements. You may find that you are not able to customize the samples at all, but rather will need to work with documents provided by your firm. The IPS in particular may not be allowed by your firm. If this is the case, check with your firm to see if it has a pre-approved IPS that you can use.

In addition to the investment plan, prepare an agenda for the meeting. Following is a typical agenda for the Investment Plan Meeting:

Investment Plan Meeting Agenda

Mr. Joseph H.N.W. Client

Monday, May 5
3:00 p.m.

  1. Ideal outcome for our meeting

  2. Overview of agenda

  3. Brief review of the wealth management process

  4. High-level presentation of the investment plan

  5. Address any questions or concerns about the investment plan

  6. Determine commitment for moving forward

  7. Overview of next steps

  8. Schedule the Mutual Commitment Meeting, if appropriate

Finally, review your compliance-related issues with your compliance professional to ensure that you have any additional required paperwork ready for this meeting. Because each firm is unique, specific compliance requirements vary from one to the next.

Overview of Investment Plan Meeting steps

  1. Greet the prospective client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

  2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

  3. Review the wealth management process.

  4. Walk the prospective client through the investment plan.

  5. Solicit and address concerns about the plan.

  6. Ask for a commitment for moving forward.

  7. Set the stage for the advanced plan.

  8. Close the meeting.

  9. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

Detailed steps and scripts for the Investment Plan Meeting

Step 1. Greet the prospective client by name and reinforce his or her high-net-worth personality.

As with the Discovery Meeting, ensure that all team members who come into contact with the prospect, such as your receptionist or another staff member assisting you in the Investment Plan Meeting, are prepared to greet the prospective client by name. Again, offer appropriate beverages and reading material in your lobby.

When you greet the prospective client, be sure to reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality, which you determined during the Discovery Meeting. For example, if the prospective client is a Family Steward, inquire about his or her children or grandchildren. Let the prospective client again know that you are excited about the possibility of working together.

Step 2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

Frame the meeting with the ideal outcome: that the prospective client leave the meeting with a good understanding of the investment plan and to determine whether you will move forward in the process. Get by in on the ideal outcome before moving forward.

Then explain to the prospective client that you believe you clearly understand his or her current situation and goals for the future and that it is your job to help your clients make smarter financial decisions.

“Joe, I’d like to start by stating what our ideal outcome for this meeting would be. We want you to leave today with a good understanding of the investment plan we have prepared for you. This will help us both determine whether we should move forward in our process. How does that sound to you?”

Assuming you get an affirmative response, continue:

“I’m really excited about getting together today to present this plan. We’ve taken the information that you provided and put the plan together to help you make informed decisions that will help you maximize the probability of achieving everything that is important to you.”

Using the agenda as your guide, explain that during the course of the meeting you will walk through the investment plan, beginning with the introduction and going through each step of the plan.

Step 3. Review the wealth management process.

Next, describe where you currently are in the wealth management process and the steps that will follow. Illustrate this with your two-page graphic overview.

“I’d like to take about 15 minutes to walk you through the plan to make sure that we have captured where you are now and where you want to go and then to help you understand the steps that we would recommend you take.

“From there, we’ll answer any questions about the plan. But remember, even if you wanted to invest at this point, I’d tell you ‘No.’ The reason is that we’re looking for a lifelong relationship. This is a consultative approach, which means that we want to ensure that we’re doing the right thing for you and that you’re comfortable every step along the way.

“After reviewing the plan, if we both feel that we have a basis for going forward together, we’ll schedule our Mutual Commitment Meeting. Between now and that meeting, please review the plan. When we get back together, I’ll answer any questions that come up for you after you leave here today. Then we’ll put the plan in place and start it working for you.

“As you probably remember from our last meeting, Joe, we use a five-meeting wealth management process. We have completed our Discovery Meeting and are about ready to go through the Investment Plan Meeting. Then we’ll schedule our Mutual Commitment Meeting shortly thereafter to begin working together. We’ll get together for our 45-Day Follow-up Meeting to help get your paperwork organized and then we’ll schedule our Regular Progress Meetings.

“So, just to check in—we’re now at the Investment Plan Meeting. Are you ready to get started?”

Step 4. Walk through the investment plan.

Now present the plan at a high level. Spend time reviewing the Total Client Profile to ensure that you fully understood the prospective client’s situation. Then briefly move through the balance of the plan, avoiding delving into too many specifics. Aim to take no more than 15 minutes to go through the plan.

Do not review the investment policy statement. Instead, give it to the prospective client and say this:

“I also have a document here that shows the thoughtfulness of our investment process. It’s called an investment policy statement. I love investments and would love nothing more than to walk you through all the details in this document, but I’ve found that most of my clients prefer just having it as a reference. So I’m going to give you this so that you can take it home and look at it there. If you have any questions about it, be sure to bring them to the next meeting and we’ll go over them together.”

Step 5. Solicit and address concerns about the plan.

Ask the prospective client to share any questions or reservations about the plan. Capture all the reservations by asking, “Are there any other concerns?” until you have heard them all. Write each concern down on the agenda. While you may be tempted to respond to each immediately, do not respond to any concern until you have heard them all. You want to get everything on the table. There may be superficial items as well as material ones, and they are often interrelated.

These are the most common concerns you will encounter:

  • There is a particular investment he or she really wants to keep (often a “sentimental investment”).

  • Questions about fees.

  • Concerns about tax considerations.

  • The prospective client forgot to tell you about one or more of his or her accounts during the Discovery Meeting.

  • The prospective client has already conducted some transactions since the Discovery Meeting.

There is a chance you will need to modify the plan in response to concerns. If that’s the case, agree to update the plan and review it with him or her within a specified time frame, as appropriate.

Step 6. Ask for a commitment for moving forward.

Once you have addressed all questions and concerns, take a moment to get a confirmation of commitment. Simply ask this:

“Joe, now that we’ve reviewed your plan, I believe that we have a basis for moving forward. How do you feel about it?”

Step 7. Set the stage for the advanced plan.

Explain that you consider investments to be only the foundation of the entire financial picture. Say that once he or she becomes a client, you will take his or her case to your professional network of professionals so that you can identify those areas beyond investments in which you can have the most impact in solving the prospective client’s financial challenges.

 

“Joe, if we decide during our Mutual Commitment Meeting to work together, we will create an advanced plan for you. As I mentioned in our first meeting, I will become your personal chief financial officer. This means that I will take your case to my network of professionals so that we can identify your specific financial challenges beyond investments and provide recommendations for addressing these challenges. I’ll present this plan to you during our first Regular Progress Meeting.”

In nearly every case, this will strongly resonate with affluent prospective clients.

Step 8. Close the meeting.

Wind up the meeting and schedule the Mutual Commitment Meeting. We recommend that you allow one week between these two meetings. As you explain the next steps, you may find it useful to again use the graphic overview of the wealth management process to show where you are in the process.

“Joe, I believe that we have the plan we need to help you achieve your financial goals. Please take the plan home with you so that you can look it over and think about any questions you may have. Feel free to note your questions right on the investment plan.

“Now we need to schedule our Mutual Commitment Meeting. At that meeting, we’ll answer all your questions and then determine whether it makes sense to make a mutual commitment to work together. If it does, then we’ll finalize the paperwork so that we can begin implementing your plan. We’ll also schedule our 45-Day Follow-up Meeting to organize paperwork.

“How does next Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. work for you? We’ll need about an hour.”

Step 9. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

As you did following the Discovery Meeting, send a letter or email the same day that conveys your pleasure in working with the prospective client and confirms the date and time of your next meeting. The letter/email below is an example.

"Dear Joe,

I enjoyed meeting again with you today. I believe that the investment plan we presented to you will be very useful in helping you to achieve your most important financial goals. Please take some time to review the plan and note any questions you may have.

As we discussed, our next step is the Mutual Commitment Meeting, when we will both decide whether it makes sense to work together. If it does, we will begin to implement your investment plan to maximize the probability of achieving all that’s important to you.

I look forward to this meeting, which we have scheduled for Tuesday, May 13, at 2:00 p.m. Plan on the meeting lasting about an hour.

If you have any questions that I may answer before that time, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent"

When prospective clients are eager to invest

Some prospective clients may want to move ahead with implementing the investment plan during the Investment Plan Meeting. You should wait until the Mutual Commitment Meeting to do so. This allows you to keep your focus on developing a trusted relationship with through the first two critical meetings of the wealth management process.

Nonetheless, some prospective clients may insist on moving ahead immediately. In this case, a good alternative is to go ahead and open the needed accounts and initiate the ACATS transfers. This gets the process started without actually implementing the plan. Explain the process like this:

“We want to hold off on investing until the next meeting so that we are sure that you’re making the best decisions. But if you want to go ahead and transfer the assets now, we can fill out the paperwork to open up the account at our firm and start the transfer. It typically takes up to two weeks to complete the transfer. So then at our next meeting, we can make the final decisions on how we’re going to execute your plan.”

Common objections during the Investment Plan Meeting

It is not uncommon for prospective clients to express concern about whether the investment returns and/or cash flow stated in the investment plan will be sufficient to reach their financial goals. They may also be concerned that their risk tolerance is different from what you uncovered during the Discovery Meeting. Using the appropriate software tools (such as Monte Carlo simulation), you should be able to demonstrate that your recommendations are suitable and will maximize the probability of success.

In addition, prospective clients may like some parts of the investment plan but not others. To address this, capture all requested modifications during the meeting so that you can take subsequent action. Often, you can just note the changes on his or her copy of the investment plan.

The Mutual Commitment Meeting

At this meeting, the prospective client will ideally become a client. Or if you have been working with a client in the rediscovery process, that client will move ahead to implement your investment plan recommendations.

Goals of the Mutual Commitment Meeting

  • To make the mutual commitment to work together and execute all the agreements needed to begin to do so

  • To obtain introductions to qualified prospective clients

Preparation for the Mutual Commitment Meeting

Have all the paperwork necessary ready to execute the investment plan’s recommendations. Review the investment plan and have a copy of it ready for the meeting. Also, review the entire client file, including the transcription of your recording of the Discovery Meeting and your notes of the questions and concerns the prospective client raised during the Investment Plan Meeting. You want to ensure that you are completely up to speed on his or her situation and investment plan so that you can answer any question confidently.

You should also have “proof statements” available. These are articles and books that address issues that you anticipate the soon-to-be new client might raise. Ideally, these would be written by you or by other authors who are aligned with your investment philosophy. For example, if you are recommending a specific stock option strategy, it would be very useful to have an article on hand that you wrote about that strategy.

As with the other meetings, prepare an agenda. A sample agenda for the Mutual Commitment Meeting is below.

Resources

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Mutual Commitment Meeting Audio

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Mutual Commitment Meeting Transcript

Mutual Commitment Meeting Agenda

Mr. Joseph H.N.W. Client

Tuesday, May 13
2:00 p.m.

  1. Ideal outcome for our meeting

  2. Overview of agenda

  3. Address any questions or concerns about the investment plan

  4. Execute documents needed to implement the investment plan

  5. A word of warning about “buyer’s remorse”

  6. Explanation of the concentrated nature of gains

  7. Second-opinion service offer

  8. Schedule the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting

Overview of steps for the Mutual Commitment Meeting

  1. Greet the prospective client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

  2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

  3. Collect all questions and then address them.

  4. Execute the documents.

  5. Congratulate the client.

  6. Caution the client about “buyer’s remorse.”

  7. Explain the concentrated nature of investment gains.

  8. Make the second-opinion service offer.

  9. Close the meeting.

  10. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

Detailed steps and scripts for the Mutual Commitment Meeting

Step 1. Greet the prospective client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

Use the same approach and greeting as in the two previous meetings. When you greet the prospective client, again be sure to reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality and to communicate that you are excited about the progress you are making together.

Step 2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

As with previous meetings, set the stage by stating the ideal outcome for the meeting and asking for affirmation from the prospective client:

“Joe, our ideal outcome today would be for us to both make the mutual commitment to working together, and then to start that process by executing the needed paperwork. How does that sound to you?”

Assuming a positive response, briefly walk through the agenda.

Step 3. Collect and address all questions.

Next ask whether there are any questions about the investment plan.

“Joe, I continue to be excited about our plan. Remember, we have two jobs here: The first is to help you make informed decisions about your money so that you can achieve all that’s important to you. The second is to provide you with peace of mind.

“With this plan, I feel strongly that we are well on our way to making informed decisions, but I wanted to check in with you to make sure that you’re comfortable with where we are. With that in mind, what concerns, if any, do you have today about implementing our plan?”

If the prospective client does have questions, write down all of them before you respond to any of them, as in the previous meeting. Keep asking, “Are there any other concerns?” until you have heard them all.

Do this because you want to address all concerns but you do not want to set yourself up for a debate. When people are investing their life savings, they often feel that they should have questions. By uncovering all questions before answering any, you can be very thoughtful in addressing the big picture first and then any details. It will also help you discern whether there is a pattern of questions that might be disguising a bigger underlying concern.

As you respond to questions, use your proof statements as applicable to address those issues.

If you need to make any adjustments to the investment plan as a result of the concerns, just mark up the changes on the plan.

Step 4. Execute the documents.

Once you have addressed all questions, say that you are ready for the prospective client to set the plan in motion by executing the required account documents.

Have all the paperwork prepared in advance, with “sign here” stickers attached in the appropriate places. As the prospective client may often be opening multiple accounts, take time to explain each set of paperwork. At this time you will also collect any checks, as appropriate.

Alternately, if the documents are to be executed electronically, walk the client through that process. Provide a tablet for this, not a laptop, as it will feel more accessible and personable.

If you have a good client service representative, bring him or her in at this point to handle this step. There are two reasons for this. First, this team member is probably much better than you at these administrative tasks and is less likely to overlook a detail. Second, it immediately establishes a relationship between the client and the client service representative, opening the door for future administrative questions to go directly to him or her.

If you have a truly outstanding customer service representative, consider leaving the room while he or she handles the document execution. This will create an even stronger relationship between the client and your team member. Once the documents are executed, return to the room to move on to the next step.

If you are working with the client in a virtual environment via Zoom, FaceTime or other video calling program, you can ask the client to execute the documents electronically. The Resources section contains our recommendations for several digital signature programs. Be sure to check with your compliance professionals on any requirements around your use of digital signature programs.

Step 5. Congratulate the client.

Once all the documents have been executed, pause for a moment to congratulate the client. You might say this:

“You should be commended for doing a great job. Congratulations on taking an extremely important step toward securing your financial future and achieving all that is important to you.”

Step 6. Caution about “buyer’s remorse.”

It’s important for your client to understand that he or she will end up with buyer’s remorse if relying on the financial media to reinforce prudent investing decisions.

Encourage the client to ignore the media (or to view it simply as entertainment) and to focus instead on making wise financial decisions and sticking with a long-term plan for maximizing the possibility of achieving all that is important to him or her.

This is very effective in focusing clients on what is truly important:

“I know you’re excited about your new plan. However, do you know what’s going to happen as soon as you walk out the door? You’re going to do what most of us do after we’ve made a major transaction: You’re going to wonder if you’ve done the right thing. You’re going to have “buyer’s remorse.”

“In fact, you’re going to be flooded with all kinds of information from television and the financial magazines that will create some confusion. Let me give you a simple example for something that’s not even close to being as important as what you’re doing with your money—buying a car.

“Who do you think are the biggest readers of car advertisements—people who are looking to buy a car or people who have just bought a car? You might be surprised, but the No. 1 readers of car advertisements are people who’ve just bought cars, primarily because they want to rationalize that they made the right decision.

“So as you go out and are exposed to the financial media—magazines and cable TV shows and so forth—we’re going to encourage you not to pay attention to it.

“Our job is to help you make informed decisions about your money so that you don’t need to pay attention to all that. As a matter of fact, many of our clients cancel their subscriptions to the Money magazines of the world so that they can focus on what’s really important to them, like …” (Depending on the prospect’s high-net-worth personality, reiterate what he or she has shared about what’s important.)

Step 7. Explain the concentrated nature of investment gains.

Help your client to stay the course over the long run by explaining that the uneven nature of investment gains is an unavoidable part of attaining investment goals. Illustrate this by showing the client the chart in Exhibit 5.3. Point out that missing just a few days over the past several decades would have resulted in a drastically lower return than would have been realized by staying invested throughout the period. (This chart is included in the sample IPS available for download from the Tools section.)

Step 8. Make the second-opinion service offer.

Now that your prospect is a client, you should immediately begin to leverage the relationship by offering your second-opinion service to the people he or she cares about. Since your new client is impressed enough to trust you with his or her financial future, he or she is often eager to have friends or family members have the same experience. You simply have to make the offer.

Beginning with the Mutual Commitment Meeting and continuing for every client meeting after that, make your second-opinion service offer to your clients like this:

“I want to offer you a complimentary service that we call our second-opinion service. It’s for the people you really care about—your friends, family members and colleagues—who may be in a complex situation or who just want to make sure they’re making smart decisions in today’s economy. We help the people taking part in this service to make informed decisions by providing them with a second opinion on their finances.

“When you introduce us to someone, we will take them through the same experience you’ve had with us. We’ll take them through the discovery process to get very clear on where they are now, where they want to go and what the gaps are. Then we’ll evaluate whether their current financial advisors are taking good care of them. If they are, we’ll recommend that they stay with their current advisors. If not, we’ll evaluate whether we would be the right advisors. As you know, we limit our practice to people for whom we can make a major impact. If we’re not the right advisors for them, we promise to point them in the direction of the right solutions.

“Whom do you know who would benefit from this service?”

If you are like many financial advisors we work with, you will find the second-opinion service offer to be a very powerful client-acquisition method. We will go into much greater detail on making and following up on the second-opinion offer later in this strategy.

Step 9. Close the meeting.

Explain that the next meeting is the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting, at which you will help the client to get completely organized with all the new account paperwork that he or she will receive over the next several weeks. Ask the client to save all this paperwork and bring it to the meeting. Agree on a date for the meeting that will be about 45 days, or six weeks, in the future. (Again, you may want to use your graphic overview of the wealth management process to remind the client about where you are in the process.)

“Joe, we need to schedule our next meeting—the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting—so we can get you organized with all your new paperwork. It will take about an hour. How does Thursday, June 26, at 11:00 a.m. look for you?”

At this point, you have done everything to delight the client. Do not thank the client for doing business with you, but rather acknowledge that you are glad that you can play an important role in helping to achieve all that is important to him or her.

 

Simply wrap up with this:

“I’m happy to be able to play such a valuable role in helping you to achieve all that is important to you. I’m looking forward to working together and to seeing you again in six weeks.”

Step 10. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

As you did following the previous meetings, send a letter or email the same day to confirm your next meeting. Also, remind the client to bring the paperwork he or she receives in coming weeks to the meeting, and thank the client for any introductions provided. The letter/email below is an example.

"Dear Joe,

I enjoyed our meeting today, and I’m pleased that we have decided to move ahead on our work in helping you achieve all that is important to you.

As I mentioned during our meeting, over the next several weeks you will receive various documents that are related to the account openings and transfers that we conducted today. Please bring this paperwork to our next meeting, where we will get it all organized for you.

Also, I wanted to thank you for introducing ________ to me. I will give her a call tomorrow to explore whether there’s a basis for us providing her with a second opinion on her finances. I’ll be sure to let you know the outcome.

I look forward to our next meeting, which we have scheduled for Thursday, June 26, at 11:00 a.m. Expect that meeting to take about an hour.

As always, if you have any questions that I can answer before that time, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent"

Common objections during the Mutual Commitment Meeting

Nearly always, if people show up for this meeting, they will execute all account documents. If they are not ready to execute the documents, they usually cancel or postpone the meeting.

We find that clients often raise the same issues again in a different way. For example, if they were concerned about fees in the prior meeting, sometimes they ask again. Your answer is the same.

Critical success factors for the Mutual Commitment Meeting

  • Be fully prepared. People are impressed when you are highly organized. Too often clients have a feeling that their advisors plan their presentations in a few minutes just prior to their meetings. Preparing a customized agenda and reviewing the client’s case file prior to the meeting will ensure that they never feel this way.

  • Have confidence in your value. Be confident that you are doing the best work possible for your client. You need complete confidence—but not arrogance—that you are adding substantial value to his or her financial life.

The 45-Day Follow Up Meeting

Because of the amount of paperwork generated when money is transferred and multiple accounts are involved, it is quite easy for the client to become overwhelmed in the weeks following the implementation of the investment plan. This meeting allows you to help the client understand and organize the financial paperwork while providing you an important opportunity to impress the client with your service.

Goals of the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting

  • To “wow” the client with your level of service

  • To help the client to be organized and to fully understand his or her paperwork

  • To obtain introductions to qualified prospective clients

Preparation for the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting

At the Mutual Commitment Meeting, you will have asked the client to bring in all the paperwork he or she receives. Create a tabbed notebook with sections for the investment plan overview, the investment policy statement, the advanced plan, brokerage statements, your regular progress reports, your newsletter (assuming that you produce one) and all other communication. Emphasize the long-term nature of your relationship by designing the notebook to accommodate at least five years’ worth of paperwork.

Alternately, if your client prefers, you can create an online storage area for electronic copies of all the paperwork (or use your client’s existing storage solution). There are now many free or inexpensive cloud storage providers which are easy to use, even for those who do not consider themselves to be computer savvy. Check with your compliance department for its requirements in use of cloud storage.

As with all other meetings in your wealth management process, prepare an agenda. A sample is below.

Resources

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45-Day Follow Up Audio

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45-Day Follow Up Transcript

45-Day Follow-up Meeting Agenda

Mr. Joseph H.N.W. Client

Thursday, June 26
11:00 a.m.

  1. Ideal outcome for our meeting

  2. Overview of agenda

  3. Address any questions or concerns

  4. Review of any major changes in your life since our last meeting

  5. Organize all paperwork

  6. Frame short-term progress with a long-term perspective

  7. Second-opinion service offer

  8. Schedule first Regular Progress Meeting

Overview of steps of the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting

  1. Greet the client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

  2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

  3. Gather and respond to questions.

  4. Ask about changes in the client’s life.

  5. Organize the paperwork.

  6. Place short-term progress into a long-term perspective.

  7. Make the second-opinion service offer.

  8. Schedule the next meeting.

  9. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

Detailed steps and scripts for the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting

Step 1. Greet the client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

As usual, use your knowledge of the client’s high-net-worth personality to make a reference about something that is personally important to the client. Let the client know that you continue to be excited about how everything is progressing and reinforce that he or she made a good decision.

 

Step 2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda

As usual, frame the meeting with the ideal outcome and ask for buy-in from the client:

“Joe, our ideal outcome for this meeting is that you leave today with all the paperwork you’ve received over the last few weeks completely organized and with a system set up to keep it organized moving forward. We don’t want you to feel overwhelming, and being organized like this will help you keep a clearer picture of your finances and help you continue to make informed decisions. How does that sound to you?”

Step 3. Collect and respond to questions.

Walk through the agenda and then ask for questions. Make sure you receive all questions before addressing any of them.

Step 4. Ask about changes in the client’s life.

Changes in the client’s life, such as a job change, a divorce, or a recent birth or death in the family, can all require adjustments to the wealth management plan. To uncover these, ask this open-ended question:

“Has anything changed personally, professionally or financially since we last met?”

As needed, ask follow-up questions to be clear about the implications of any changes. Have the client’s Total Client Profile on hand to immediately note the changes where appropriate.

Step 5. Organize the paperwork.

Give the client the notebook that you have prepared in advance. Point out the different tabbed sections in the notebook, and explain briefly what each one is for. Place all the documents in the appropriate sections, showing the client how to read each of the documents as you do so.

If the client prefers to use a cloud storage provider for the documents, show him or her how to access and view the records electronically.

Clients will frequently remark on the volume of records they are receiving. Explain that this is driven by regulatory requirements and that they will continue to receive a fair amount of paperwork. Invite clients to bring in these additional records to your Regular Progress Meetings, along with the notebook, so that you can continue to help them to continue to be organized.

Step 6. Place short-term progress into a long-term perspective.

Many portfolio management software programs annualize returns even for short periods, and your client will no doubt notice these returns as you are helping to organize the paperwork. If the market did well during the 45 days since the client began working with you, the annualization of the returns will make you look like a genius. On the other hand, if the market is down, the negative returns will make the client wonder why he or she is paying you.

We recommend that you turn this into a learning opportunity, using it as a real-world illustration of the irrelevancy of short-term returns. Explain it like this:

“What’s really important is not investment performance over any isolated period, but achieving your goals over your lifetime. What has happened in the last 45 days has little to do with achieving your goals, because in the long run, the only way to achieve your goals is to make smart decisions about your money. In the short term, no one can know with any accuracy which way the market will move. But in the long term, by making prudent decisions, we can maximize the probability of your success.”

Step 7. Make the second-opinion service offer.

As you did during the Mutual Commitment Meeting, offer to provide a second opinion on the finances of people the client cares about. While you may not receive an introduction at every meeting, you are setting the expectation that you will make this offer each time.

Step 8. Schedule the next meeting.

Schedule the next meeting, which will be your first Regular Progress Meeting. Confirm the time interval at which the client would like to meet with you, such as quarterly or semiannually. (We recommend a quarterly interval, assuming that the client agrees.)

 

Explain the Regular Progress Meetings in this way:

“Joe, now that we have begun to implement your investment plan and have organized your paperwork, I would like to schedule the first of our Regular Progress Meetings.

“At this first meeting, I will present to you our advanced plan. The advanced plan will contain our recommendations for addressing your financial concerns in four major areas. The four areas are mitigating taxes, which we call wealth enhancement, taking care of your heirs, or wealth transfer, protecting yourself from having your assets unjustly taken, which we call wealth protection, and finally, making the charitable impact you want, or charitable giving.

“With your agreement, the advanced plan will become the third part of your overall wealth management plan, along with the investment plan and investment policy statement that you already have. The complete wealth management plan will become our road map for addressing your wealth management needs as we move forward. Then we will use subsequent

 

Regular Progress Meetings to review your progress toward achieving your financial goals.

“Usually, I like to meet with my valued clients about X times a year. How would that work for you?”

Step 9. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

On the same day as your 45-Day Follow-up Meeting, send the client a confirmation of your first Regular Progress Meeting via mail or email. Also, offer your help in continuing to keep the client’s financial records organized. If the client provided any introductions at this meeting, be sure to acknowledge these. The letter/email below is an example.

Dear Joe,

I’m glad that we had the opportunity today to get your new account paperwork organized. As I mentioned at our meeting, you will continue to receive documentation on a regular basis. If you’d like our help in organizing this paperwork, feel free to bring it in to our Regular Progress Meetings so that we can assist you in keeping it organized.

I look forward to our first Regular Progress Meeting, which we scheduled for Tuesday, October 7, at 9:00 a.m. Expect this meeting to take about an hour.

As we discussed today, we will present our advanced plan to you at this meeting. Should you choose to implement the recommendations in the plan, we will make the plan the third part of your overall wealth management plan. Together with your investment plan and investment policy statement, the advanced plan will serve as our road map as we move ahead in addressing your most important financial concerns.

In the meantime, if you have any questions or concerns that I can address, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

 

Critical success factors for the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting

  • Be prepared. Have a tabbed notebook or online storage area ready for the client’s documents.

  • Deliver the big picture. Reinforce the fact that when you meet with the client to report progress, he or she may often be disappointed with the short-term investment performance. Point out that despite this, the client will still be on track to achieve his or her long-term goals.

Regular Progress Meeting

Your Regular Progress Meetings provide the opportunity to continue to build your relationship with the client while you work to help maximize the client’s probability of achieving all that is most important to him or her. At each meeting, you will uncover any changes in the client’s life—a job change or the birth of a grandchild, for example—that might call for you to make adjustments to the wealth management plan. You will also review the client’s progress to ensure that he or she is on track to achieving key goals.

In addition, at your first Regular Progress Meeting with each client, present the advanced plan. The plan will contain a range of recommendations, each designed to address a specific financial concern. With client approval, you will then begin to implement the plan, focusing first on the action items of highest priority. At subsequent meetings, update the client on the progress of the recommendations.

Your Regular Progress Meetings enable you not only to go on addressing your client’s needs well, but also to gather qualified client introductions and additional assets to manage.

Preparation for Regular Progress Meetings

Your chief undertaking in advance of the first Regular Progress Meeting will be to prepare the client’s advanced plan. In most cases, you will rely on your professional network to analyze the client’s situation and devise recommendations.

Every advanced plan should deal with the four key areas of the client’s financial life beyond his or her investments:

  1. Wealth enhancement aims to mitigate tax impact while producing the best possible investment returns consistent with the client’s level of risk tolerance.

  2. Wealth transfer helps find and facilitate the most tax-efficient way to pass assets to succeeding generations in a way that meets the client’s wishes.

  3. Wealth protection aims to protect the client’s wealth against potential creditors, litigants, children’s spouses and potential ex-spouses, as well as protect the client against catastrophic loss.

  4. Charitable giving helps fulfill the client’s charitable goals and can often support efforts in each of the other three areas.

None of these areas stands in isolation from the rest. Wealth protection, for example, is often intertwined with wealth transfer needs. The major advantage of the wealth management plan is that it enables you to deal with each area systematically while maintaining an integrated approach to the client’s overall financial picture.

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Regular Progress Meeting Audio

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Regular Progress Meeting Transcript

We recommend that you apply mind mapping techniques to the creation of the advanced plan. As Exhibit 5.4 shows, the client is at the center of the plan, connected to each of the four major areas of wealth management. In a fully developed plan, you will connect specific recommendations and action items within each of the four areas as appropriate.

Creating a mind map of each advanced plan has three important benefits:

  1. It provides a one-page overview of every important financial task required for achieving the client’s goals. In contrast to a long to-do list, a mind map makes it easy for the client to see the connections between actions and to grasp the larger picture.

  2. It becomes a visual road map. As you proceed in implementing the plan, the mind map helps you both to track your progress and move forward expeditiously.

  3. It demonstrates the value you are providing. As you more forward, the client will easily see the actions that have been completed. Over time, these will accumulate into an impressive body of work—and tremendous value to the client.

In Strategy 6: Build and Manage Your Professional Network, you will learn exactly how to collaborate with your network of professional advisors to create advanced plans.

In addition to the advanced plan, you should also create an agenda as usual. The following is a sample agenda for the first Regular Progress Meeting:

Regular Progress Meeting Agenda

Mr. Joseph H.N.W. Client

Tuesday, October 7
9:00 a.m.

  1. Ideal outcome for our meeting

  2. Overview of agenda

  3. Address any questions or concerns

  4. Review of any major changes in your life since our last meeting

  5. Review of investment performance relative to realizing your financial goals

  6. Presentation of advanced plan

  7. Discuss and prioritize action items in advanced plan

  8. Second-opinion service offer and request for additional assets

  9. Schedule next Regular Progress Meeting

Goals of the Regular Progress Meetings

  • To reinforce that the client remains on track to achieving all that is important to him or her

  • To expand the scope of issues addressed beyond investments

  • To reinforce the client’s position as a marketing apostle for your business

  • To obtain introductions to qualified prospective clients and to capture additional assets

Step-by-step actions for the first Regular Progress Meeting

  1. Greet the client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

  2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

  3. Collect questions.

  4. Ask about changes in the client’s life.

  5. Review investment performance.

  6. Present the advanced plan.

  7. Discuss and prioritize action items in the advanced plan.

  8. Answer any additional questions.

  9. Make the second-opinion service offer.

  10. Ask for additional assets to manage.

  11. Schedule the next Regular Progress Meeting.

  12. Send out confirmation of the next meeting.

Detailed steps and scripts for the first Regular Progress Meeting

Step 1. Greet the client by name. Reinforce some aspect of his or her high-net-worth personality.

This step will be second nature to you by now.

Step 2. Set the stage for the meeting and review the agenda.

As with all your meeting set the stage with the ideal outcome and affirmation from the client:

“Joe, our ideal outcome for our meeting today is for you to leave with an advanced plan that addresses all your financial concerns beyond investments. We will have reviewed all the action items in that plan and determined together which ones are priorities for you. How does that sound to you?”

Then briefly outline the meeting agenda as you have done before.

Step 3. Collect questions.

Then ask for any questions. Write all the questions down, but hold off on answering them at this time. Instead move on to the next step in the meeting. In most cases, you will find that your progress report will answer many of the questions.

 

Step 4. Ask about major changes in the client’s personal or financial life.

As you did in the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting, be sure to uncover any substantial changes in your client’s life by asking this question:

“Has anything changed personally, professionally or financially since we last met?”

Ask clarifying follow-up questions if needed and note the changes on the client’s Total Client Profile.

Step 5. Review investment performance.

Your client will want to know whether he or she is on track to realizing his or her financial goals. Go over the client’s current investment position, pointing out any significant changes. Review progress, including for the quarter, year to date and since inception. Explain performance, both relative and absolute, and place the progress within the context of the appropriate market benchmarks. You should be able to explain the impact of current economic and capital market conditions on investment performance.

Also, avoid surprises by discussing any changes that you anticipate making. Frame all of this within the larger context of whether or not the client is on track to achieving all his or her most important financial goals.

For some clients, you may find it worthwhile to supplement your discussion about progress with additional information. For example, articles that discuss a specific investment strategy being used can lend some additional perspective. Do not go overboard here, however. As you know, most of the high-net-worth personalities are not particularly interested in the technical aspects of investing; they just want to have enough information so that they can be confident in you and your team’s ability to help them make informed decisions. To overload them with information would show insecurity on your part.

Step 6. Present the advanced plan.

Now present the advanced plan, moving through each of the four sections and pointing out the items that you believe are of highest priority.

Remain at a high level at this point. If your advanced plan contains any recommendations for complex solutions, do not delve too deeply into specifics. Instead, discuss in general terms the particular financial challenge and how your recommended solution would address it.

Step 7. Discuss and prioritize action items in the advanced plan.

Once you have presented an overview of the plan, discuss each recommended action in more depth. Provide as much detail as the client needs to make a decision about moving forward on that item. For each item, guide the client in choosing one of three actions:

  1. Drop it: The client decides to not implement your recommendation. Honor your client’s decision by removing the item from the wealth management plan. If you believe that the item is extremely important, make a note to raise the issue again in a year or two. As your relationship grows over time, the client may become more inclined to accept the recommendation.

  2. Defer it: The client decides to put the item on hold. This will commonly happen with more complex recommendations, such as creating certain types of trusts. Before taking such a step, the client will likely want to give it more thought and discuss it with family members and with other professional advisors. When the client decides to defer a recommendation, encourage him or her to set a target date for finalizing the decision. Make a note to revisit the issue at that time.

  3. Do it: The client decides to implement the recommendation. In this case, there are three courses of action:

    1. The client chooses to take the action himself or herself. This is common when the task is straightforward, such as making adjustments to property or casualty insurance.

    2. The client chooses to have another professional advisor take the action. If the client already has a close relationship with an attorney, for example, he or she may be inclined to turn to that professional for assistance with the task.

    3. The client chooses to have you take the action. In nearly all cases, you will turn to members of your network of professionals to implement the recommendation.

As you move through the advanced plan, mark it up to note the client’s decision about each task. Place the tasks the client decides to undertake in order of priority from high to low.

Once your review of the advanced plan is complete, set the stage for moving forward:

“Thank you for reviewing the advanced plan with me. I feel that we’ve made some important decisions and set good priorities that will enable us to move forward promptly.

“As you can see, I’ve made note of all the decisions we’ve made today. I will use these notes to revise the plan so that it reflects your decisions. I’ll have that revised plan ready for our next Regular Progress Meeting, where we’ll go over the progress that we make in the coming months.

“In the meantime, you have agreed to take several actions yourself, including ___________ and __________. If I can be of assistance with any of those, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

“We also decided that I will facilitate work with our professional network on two high-priority tasks, including ___________ and __________. I will have their offices contact you to set up a meeting so that you can work directly with them in exploring how best to implement those recommendations.”

Step 8. Answer any additional questions.

Review your notes on any questions that the client added to the agenda at the beginning of the meeting. If any open questions remain, answer them at this point.

Step 9. Make the second-opinion offer.

As you have at previous meetings, offer to provide a second opinion on the finances of people important to the client introduces.

Step 10. Request additional assets to manage.

At this time, you may ask the client for additional assets to manage. Do so in this way:

“Joe, we’ve had a great year and we’re making good progress together on achieving your financial goals. As you shared with me in our Discovery Meeting, it’s very important for you to ___________.” (Insert what the client said was most important about money to him or her in the Discovery Meeting.)

“One of the things that we can do to maximize the probability of achieving everything you want is to review all of your accounts. By doing a diagnostic review of where you are now with all your accounts, both with us and with other firms, and where you want to go, we can ensure that everything is balanced in the right proportions and that all the parts of your portfolio are working optimally together to achieve your goals. Would you like us to conduct this review for you?”

We’ll provide the key success factors for asset capture in the next section of this strategy.

Step 11. Schedule the next Regular Progress Meeting.

Because you will have already agreed on the preferred interval for your Regular Progress Meetings, just schedule an appropriate date and time in the future. Refresh the client’s memory once again about where you are in the wealth management process, using your graphic overview of the process.

Step 12. Send confirmation of the next meeting.

As usual, mail or email a confirmation of your next meeting on the same day as your Regular Progress Meeting. Express your pleasure at the client’s progress toward his or her financial goals, and note any specific commitments that you made to follow up on recommendations in the advanced plan. A sample confirmation is below.

Dear Joe,

I enjoyed our meeting today and the opportunity to review with you the progress we are making toward achieving your most important financial goals.

I also enjoyed the opportunity to present our advanced plan to you. We agreed on the following actions:

  • Actions that you agreed to take: ________________ and ____________________

  • Actions that I will facilitate with members of my professional network: ________________ and ___________________

I look forward to our next Regular Progress Meeting, which we scheduled for Friday, January 9 at 1:00 p.m.

If any questions arise, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time.

Sincerely,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

Actions for subsequent Regular Progress Meetings

Streamline

Combine Steps 6 and 7 into one step where you discuss the progress being made with each action item in the advanced plan. If necessary, adjust priority levels of specific action items.

Follow up on asset request

If the client agreed to you conducting a diagnostic review of his or her outside accounts and the resulting updated investment plan is complete, deliver the results at the next Regular Progress Meeting. When appropriate, recommend transfer of assets to your services. You can make your recommendation in this way:

“Joe, we have completed the diagnostic review of your accounts and have updated your investment plan. As you can see, there is an opportunity to significantly improve the probability of achieving your financial goals if we were to transfer your current _______ account to our firm. This would result in a much more efficient portfolio for the level of risk you’ve told us you want to take, a reduction in fees and a significantly lower ongoing tax liability, as indicated by our report.

“To accomplish this transfer, I simply need you to acknowledge your desire to transfer the account so that we can get everything started right away. It typically takes four weeks to complete the transfer and redeploy your investment.”

If it is not appropriate for the assets to be aggregated with you, be sure to point that out, as it will reinforce your role as

trusted financial advisor.

Direct questions to your professional network as appropriate

If the client has a question about an aspect of the advanced plan that is being handled by one of your professional network members, do not attempt to answer it yourself. Instead, facilitate having the question answered by the professional by arranging for him or her to contact the client directly.

Critical success factors for Regular Progress Meetings

  • Be prepared. You need to know exactly what is happening with the investment account as well as with any current activity related to implementing recommendations from the advanced plan. If there have been any major changes—such as a change in a key investment manager—since your last meeting, notify the client in advance so that there are no surprises.

  • Have timely information. Always use the most up-to-date information possible: the previous day’s closing statements.

  • Reinforce the long-term perspective. Remind the client about the importance of maintaining a long-term perspective in order to remain on track in achieving important goals, even if his or her investment performance over the most recent period is down.

  • Keep your edge. It is easy to fall into the trap of routine when conducting Regular Progress Meetings. Remember that you are on stage and have to deliver your best performance every time.

Rediscovery Process Meeting

Ideally, the first 20 individuals that you take through the wealth management process will be current clients who are qualified for your wealth management services. You already have trusted relationships with these people, so they will be more likely to overlook any rough spots in your process as you get it off the ground. (If you do not have 20 clients who are qualified for your wealth management services, take as many through the wealth management process as you have.)

When you take existing clients through your wealth management process, we call it the “rediscovery process.” Instead of calling the first meeting a Discovery Meeting, we call it a Rediscovery Meeting. Other than these name differences, however, you will conduct the process in the same way for both existing clients and prospective clients.

Once you have perfected your process on these 20 clients, you will be ready to take new prospective clients through it.

We recommend the following steps for your rediscovery process.

Step 1. Identify clients who are appropriate for your wealth management process.

You are promising to deliver a high-quality experience that requires both time and resources to deliver, so choose the clients wisely. To the extent that you work with clients who are not ideal for wealth management, you are less able to focus on those who are. This will make it much more difficult to keep your promise of a high-quality experience to these clients.

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Rediscovery Process Meeting Transcript

While the best clients for your wealth management experience are those who match your ideal client profile, you may not have even one client who fits this description. However, given that they are established clients who already trust you, you should still be able to identify clients who are suitable for your wealth management process.

Step 2. Ensure that wealth management is in the clients’ best interests.

Your wealth management process should leave your clients in a more favorable position to achieve their goals or it should not be undertaken. Review any potential conversions to wealth management with your compliance professionals.

 

Step 3. Call the clients to whom you would like to provide wealth management.

Let your clients know that you are making some changes in the way that you work with them, which you believe will maximize the probability of reaching their long-term financial goals. Explain it like this:

“Sarah, you are one of my favorite clients, and I really respect your opinion. We’re in the process of changing the way we do business. Going forward, each of our clients will have a written, personal investment plan as well as an advanced plan that addresses issues beyond investments. As one of my most valued clients, I would very much appreciate your thoughts on our new, improved process.

“To develop your investment plan and advanced plan, we need to schedule a Discovery Meeting, which is the first step in our new wealth management process. At this meeting, I’d like to treat you as if you were a new client. I’ll ask you all the questions that I would ask a new client—even though I believe I know many of the answers—so that I do not miss any information on your current financial situation or about your financial goals. Based on this interview, we will prepare your investment plan to ensure that you are well-positioned to achieve your goals in today’s market environment.”

 

Step 4. Conduct the Discovery Meeting.

Conduct the meeting as we have described in this strategy. Even though you may think you know everything about your clients, you will very likely uncover opportunities during this Discovery Meeting that you never before even guessed at.

 

Step 5. Continue with the wealth management process.

Once you have conducted the Discovery Meeting and the client has agreed to move ahead, conduct the balance of the wealth management process.

Key Success Factors in Asset Capture

The benefit in asking for and receiving additional assets to manage from your existing clients goes beyond the additional income derived from these assets. The new assets provide added opportunities to serve your clients well. This experience in turn enhances client trust and loyalty, paving the way for you to receive yet more assets to manage in the future.

Both our research and coaching experience has repeatedly confirmed that the financial advisors most likely to receive the greatest amounts of additional assets to manage are those who ask for them on a regular basis. While a client may occasionally, without prompting, provide you with additional assets to manage, you must ask for additional assets to receive them regularly. These are the key factors in effectively capturing additional assets.

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Continuously cultivate the relationship

Keep in mind that each affluent client generally has multiple financial advisors. Your goal is to increase your share of your clients’ assets by ensuring that they are completely satisfied with their relationship with you.

Investment performance only goes so far in guaranteeing client satisfaction. To keep your affluent clients over the long term, you must also foster the client relationship. This is just as well, given that you cannot control investment performance.

You do, however, control the quality of your relationships with your affluent clients. You have the ability to ensure very satisfied clients through your relationships. These satisfied clients will, in turn, give you more of their assets to manage. And the greater their satisfaction, the more likely they are to add even more assets.

Know about the other assets

You should have a clear understanding of the overall assets of your clients—what they have and who is managing those assets. Your wealth management process, and especially the Total Client Profile, is essential for this. Once you have completed the Discovery Meeting, you will know about the assets that are managed by other financial advisors and will be able to target these assets for capture where appropriate.

Recognize the triggers for asset transfer

There are a number of situational triggers that provide openings for a transfer of assets. These can be any meaningful changes in a client’s life (such as a divorce, remarriage or birth of a grandchild); in the client’s portfolio (such as a retirement rollover or inheritance); in the market (such as a major upward or downward swing); or in tax law (such as changes in estate taxes). All these are excellent opportunities for clients to consider moving assets to you.

Ask at every Regular Progress Meeting

Remind your clients at each of your Regular Progress Meetings that you are keenly interested in their overall wellbeing and that this includes taking into account the ways that other financial advisors are managing their assets.

Make your offer to conduct a diagnostic review of assets managed by other advisors as we described in the steps for the Regular Progress Meeting. Over time, you clients will come to expect this offer at each meeting.

Thank your clients

Let your clients know that you appreciate the trust they have placed in you—whether or not you have received any additional assets. Always remember that your relationships with your high-net-worth clients are the foundation to your greater success.

The Second-Opinion Service: Making The Offer

CEG Worldwide’s research—as well as our anecdotal experience in working with thousands of the top financial advisors in the country—tells us that introductions by existing clients to friends, family members and associates is one of the most effective ways of bringing in new affluent clients.

But you have to be proactive in seeking these introductions. Clients may occasionally make introductions simply because you provide high-quality service and they enjoy working with you, but this will not happen often enough to significantly grow your affluent client base. So while satisfied clients are generally happy to provide introductions, they need a way to do so.

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Your second-opinion offer service offer will be their route for easily introducing you to the people they care about.

The second-opinion offer works in both face-to-face client meetings and via email.

Making the second-opinion offer during client meetings

We recommend making the offer when a prospect first becomes a client during the Mutual Commitment, again at the 45-Day Follow-up Meeting and then at every Regular Progress Meeting. You should also make the offer at the end of each of your private client events and webinars. Simply follow these steps.

Step 1. Describe the offer.

“I want to offer you a complimentary service that we call our second-opinion service. It’s for the people you really care about—your friends, family members and colleagues—who may be in a complex situation or who just want to make sure they’re making smart decisions in today’s economy. We help the people taking part in this service to make informed decisions by providing them with a second opinion on their finances."

“When you introduce us to someone, we will take them through the same experience you’ve had with us. We’ll take them through the discovery process to get very clear on where they are now, where they want to go and what the gaps are. Then we’ll evaluate whether their current financial advisors are taking good care of them. If they are, we’ll recommend that they stay with their current advisors. If not, we’ll evaluate whether we would be the right advisors. As you know, we limit our practice to people for whom we can make a major impact. If we’re not the right advisors for them, we promise to point them in the direction of the right solutions."

“Whom do you know who would benefit from this service?”

Perfecting your second-opinion script and name

Use our recommended script only as a starting point. You offer will be most effective when you present it in a way that you are completely comfortable with, so make changes as needed to accomplish that. As you make modifications, bear in mind that your offer should do four things:

  1. Describe the reason you offer the service. Typically, the reason is because people are concerned about making informed decisions in the current economy.

  2. Describe the service itself. This is simply a brief description of your Discovery Meeting.

  3. Describe the possible outcomes for people using the service. To be comfortable providing introductions, clients need to know what may happen to the people they introduce. State that you will make one of three recommendations: staying with their current advisor, moving to you and moving to a different advisor.

  4. Make a call to action. Simply ask the client to tell you about any people they care about who would benefit from the service. Do not be directional by describing a particular type of individual you may have in mind; just let the client provide you with names.

In addition, keep in mind that you may call the second-opinion service itself whatever you like. While most financial advisors we coach prefer “second-opinion service,” others have chosen to rename it. “Strategic wealth analysis,” “wealth diagnostic service” and “wealth management assessment” are examples of alternate names. If you do choose to create your own branding, make sure that the name you select supports the fact that you will make the offer both directly to individuals as well as to clients who may introduce you to other individuals.

Step 2. Extend the offer again.

Once you have received a name, extend the offer again. Just say this:

“Great. Who else comes to mind?”

Continue until no other names are offered. If this concerns you in any way, consider the record held by a Family Steward who took out his phone and identified 96 potential ideal clients. A reasonable expectation is three to five, but why be reasonable?

Once you have a list of names, request the background and contact information of each one.

When there are no introductions

Many clients will take you up on your second-opinion offer. But if you do not receive any introductions the first time you make the offer, just let them know that you will make the offer again at each meeting:

“Even though no one comes to mind right now, I’d like you to continue to think over my offer. If you do think of someone later, please either save the name for our next Regular Progress Meeting—because I’m going to offer my second-opinion service at each meeting—or just give me a call.”

You may also wish to give clients who do not take you up on your offer a flyer on your second-opinion service. This will remind them of your offer after they have left your office. A customizable two-page flyer is available in the Tools section. Modify it as needed to match your process and your firm’s branding.

In some cases, it may be more appropriate to ask the client to make a face-to-face introduction where all three of you are present. You might arrange to do this over golf at a country club, at a lunch at a nice restaurant or at a sporting event. This would be your preferred option if it is clear from the conversation that the prospective client has a very high net worth and/or there is a high likelihood of having immediate success with the prospective client. As you move upmarket to the super-affluent and ultra-affluent, face-to-face introductions become even more important (and more expected by the upmarket affluent prospect).

Making the second-opinion offer via email

If you have clients who prefer to communicate with you via email, it can be effective to conduct a one-time email campaign to make your second-opinion offer to these individuals. If you choose to do this, don’t neglect to still make the offer during your face-to-face client meetings.

Step 1. Send the email.

We recommend the following email. You will notice that the language is very similar to our recommended script for the second-opinion service. As with the script, be sure to make modifications as needed to match your own voice.

Subject line: Announcing my new second-opinion service

Dear Barbara,

I am pleased to announce that we now offer a complimentary second-opinion service. It’s for the people you really care about—your friends, family members and colleagues—who may be in a complex situation or who just want to make sure they’re making smart decisions in today’s economy. We help the people taking part in this service to make informed decisions by providing them with a second opinion on their finances.

When you introduce us to someone, we will take them through the same experience you’ve had with us. We’ll take them through the discovery process to get very clear on where they are now, where they want to go and what the gaps are. Then we’ll evaluate whether their current financial advisors are taking good care of them. If they are, we’ll recommend that they stay with their current advisors. If not, we’ll evaluate whether we would be the right advisors. As you know, we limit our practice to people for whom we can make a major impact. If we’re not the right advisors for them, we promise to point them in the direction of the right solutions.

Please let me know if you would like us to contact someone you care about to schedule our second-opinion service. Simply reply to this email with his or her name, email address and phone number. We will do our best to ensure they are well-positioned to effectively address today’s uncertainties.

In case you would like to know more about our second-opinion service, I am attaching a flyer that provides additional detail.

I look forward to seeing you at our next meeting.

All the best,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

Attachment: Second-opinion service flyer

Step 2. Request a personal introduction.

When you receive introductions in response to your email, do the same thing as when you receive introductions during client meetings: request a personal introduction. You can do so with the email below. As usual, a template is available in the Tools section.

Subject line: RE: Announcing my new second-opinion service

Dear Barbara,

I appreciate you letting me know about Mitch and Stephanie. I look forward to meeting them and taking them through our second-opinion service.

We’ve found that the best way for us to get in touch with people is for you to either call or email to give them a heads-up that I will be getting in touch. I would appreciate it if you did this. You can let them know that I’m your financial advisor and that I’m offering a second-opinion service to friends and associates of my top clients. You can say that even though you don’t know whether this service is appropriate for them or not, you did ask me to reach out to them so that they can make that decision.

If you would prefer to email Mitch and Stephanie rather than calling them, I’ve attached an email that you may want to use. I want to make it as easy as possible for you to reach out to them.

If you could contact them Mitch and Stephanie within 24 hours, I will commit to contacting them right after that. I’ll let you know how the conversation goes.

All the best,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

Attachment: email to Mitch and Stephanie

Attach to the email a copy of the same email that you provide to clients who provide you with introductions during your face-to-face meetings.

The Second-Opinion Service:

Following Up Effectively

Once you have received an introduction, follow up to optimize that chances that the prospective client will schedule a Discovery Meeting with you and that the client will provide more introductions in the future.

Contact each prospective client

Your goal for the initial contact should be to schedule a Discovery Meeting so that you can gather the information necessary for you to formulate a second opinion on the prospective client’s finances and to determine whether you would be able to add significant value to his or her financial life.

When making this first contact, use this script:

“Hello, Mitch. Barbara Smith asked me to contact you, and I promised him/her that I would. I’m her personal chief financial officer, James Advisor.

“Barbara spoke highly of you and thought that you might be able to benefit from our complimentary second-opinion service. She wanted you to know about the sophisticated wealth management process that we use in assisting clients in reaching their financial goals.

“Barbara wasn’t sure if you would be interested in getting together to review your current investment plan so that I can provide you with a second opinion on your finances, but she thought you’d be the best person to make that decision.”

The person will respond in one of three ways, each of which requires a different response from you.

1. “No.”

The prospective client will typically want to decline because he or she already has a financial advisor. If this is the case, have this script ready about getting a second opinion:

“That’s great that you have a financial advisor."

“We find that with today’s volatile market and changing tax laws, many people would like to have a second opinion to make sure that they’re on track to achieving their financial goals. I would be more than happy to get together and see if that makes sense for your situation."

“We don’t take clients unless we can add substantial value to their financial lives, so if your financial advisor is already doing a great job, certainly we would recommend that you continue to work with him or her."

“Would you like a second opinion on your finances?”

2. “Maybe.”

You will seldom get this response, but when you do, it is most often because the prospective client has hesitation about the cost. If so, respond in this way:

“There’s no cost to get together in our initial consultative meeting, which we call the Discovery Meeting, because we are looking to see if we can add substantial value. We never take any clients unless we’re sure that we can add this kind of value to their financial lives.”

3. “Yes.”

Schedule a date and time for the Discovery Meeting. Explain that you will send the prospective client a follow-up letter outlining the financial information and records you would like him or her to bring to the meeting in order to make the meeting extremely productive.

Immediately after arranging the Discovery Meeting, send the prospective client a confirmation letter exactly as you learned earlier in this strategy.

Close The Loop With The Client

A client who provides one introduction is likely to provide introductions again. Keep the client inclined to make additional introductions by expressing your appreciation and by informing him or her about the outcome of the introduction.

You do need to protect client confidentiality, of course, so obtain the prospective client’s permission to report back to the client who provided the introduction.

Assuming that you receive permission, send the client a letter to express your thanks for the introduction and to let him or her know how the first meeting went—whether or not the prospective client decided to work with you. Below are follow-up letters for both situations. Templates for both are in the Tools section.

Dear Barbara,

Thank you again for providing an introduction to Mitch and Stephanie Jones.

I wanted to drop you a quick note to let you know that Mitch and Stephanie and I recently got together. We completed a wealth management plan for them and they hired our firm to implement the plan.

Thanks again, Barbara. I look forward to seeing you at our next meeting.

All the best,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

Dear Barbara,

I wanted to drop you a quick note to let you know that Mitch and Stephanie Jones and I decided not to work together. While not everyone will be appropriate to work with our firm, I’m glad that we are still able to provide a valuable service to the people you care about through our second-opinion service.

Please let me know if there is anyone else who you think would benefit from this service.

Thanks again, Barbara. I look forward to seeing you at our next meeting.

All the best,
Financial Advisor to the Affluent

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The Total Client Model

Sourcing Wealthy Clients

Today’s environment presents some amazing opportunities. Never before have there been so many wealthy individuals and families who need assistance in managing their wealth. And new wealth continues to be generated at an astounding rate. This means there have never been better opportunities for you as a financial advisor—provided you know how to attract and serve the wealthy.

You see, there is really only one thing that separates the top advisors from all the rest. It’s not talent. And it’s not technical competence. After all, there are plenty of talented, technically astute financial advisors out there who are not particularly successful. Likewise, there are some incredibly successful advisors who could probably be giving much better advice.

What is the one thing that sets the most successful advisors head and shoulders above the rest? It’s their ability to source wealthy clients. These financial advisors are highly motivated to build their practices by working with the affluent, and for some very good reasons:

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  • Greater revenue. The affluent can generate a disproportionate amount of revenue compared with less-prosperous clients. The affluent typically use a broad range of services and products, and use them consistently (think money management) or repeatedly (such as tax planning). Furthermore, as their lives change, their likely use of services and products will change, resulting in additional business opportunities for financial advisors. Consequently, the affluent provide you with the potential for greater revenue both initially and over time.

  • Greater referral opportunities. The affluent tend to have more extensive networks and are more likely to have strong influence within their networks. It’s the nature of wealth to directly and indirectly connect productively with others. In studying the wealth-creating mindsets and methodologies of self-made million¬aires, we regularly find their strategic networking abilities to be a major factor in their success. Optimizing your relationships with these clients can result in a steady stream of qualified referrals.

  • Ability to pay for your expertise. The affluent have the financial wherewithal to acquire the services and products they deem worthwhile. While less-affluent clients might have many of the same needs and wants as the wealthy, it’s the well-to-do who can afford the quality know-how and deliverables of a diverse range of professionals. They have the financial resources to pay—and pay well—for your expertise.

The value and advantages of working with the affluent are not lost on financial advisors or other professional advisors. This makes for a hyper-competitive environment for the business of the wealthy.

The Transformative Potential of the Total Client Model

 

With this intense and intensifying competition, how do you gain the advantage? We believe the single most effective action you can take to attract affluent clients and keep them for the long term is to engage in a process of holistic profiling of each client. More specifically, you should use the Total Client Model.

Not only is the Total Client Model very effective in helping financial advisors facilitate the well-being of their wealthy clients, but it has also proven to help advisors dramatically boost their business success.

We have seen the advisors who commit themselves to learning and applying the Total Client Model develop extremely loyal wealthy clienteles and practices that are dramatically more successful than most of their peers’. These advisors regularly leave their competition in the dust as they considerably enhance their revenue and translate their success into appreciably more personal wealth.

By making the Total Client Model an integral part of your practice, you’ll have the ability to be more attentive, responsive and solution-driven. This translates into your ability to do a meaningfully better job for your affluent clients not only in the services and products you provide but also in directing them to other experts as appropriate.

This deep commitment to the well-being of your affluent clients has the advantageous byproduct of potentially making your practice exponentially more lucrative. In short, the Total Client Model holds the potential to transform your practice and, consequently, the scale of your personal wealth.

However, you’ll be successful only when you move from knowing to doing. Professionals who have been successful using the Total Client Model made the serious commitment to learning the process and unfailingly applying it. We will guide you through every step of implementing the Total Client Model and give you specific assignments that will help make your new knowledge real and practical in your own business. But it will be up to you to fully implement this knowledge to achieve the kind of success the Total Client Model can deliver. Let’s get started.

Resources

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Transformative Potential  Audio

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Transformative Potential  Audio

Resources

Making It Real: Identify Your 10 Best Clients

We will ask you to do several exercises throughout this program to help you translate what you are learning to practical actions in your practice. To begin, identify your 10 best clients. These are clients you:

In addition, to the extent possible, they should be clients you think have additional potential in that they can use more of your services and products, be solid sources of qualified referrals, or both.